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Estimating Consumer Energy Demand Using International Data: Theoretical and Policy Implications

Dale S. Rothman, J. Ho Hong and Timothy D. Mount

Year: 1994
Volume: Volume15
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol15-No2-4
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Abstract:
In this paper, consumer energy demand is estimated as part of a complete demand system using a consistent set of international data on prices, and expenditures for 53 countries ranging from the poorest to the wealthiest. We compare three models: the Translog, the Deaton-Muellbauer Almost Ideal! Demand System (DM), and the Generalized Logit (Logit), and two levels of commodity aggregation (6-good and 9-good). The estimation results indicate that the model specification and level of aggregation are important. The Logit model performs better than the Translog and D-M models which provide illogical! elasticity estimates for many countries. The 9-good model shows that the demand for electricity is significantly more price and income elastic than the demand for primary energy.



Swiss Residential Demand for Electricity by Time-of-Use: An Application of the Almost Ideal Demand System

Massimo Filippini

Year: 1995
Volume: Volume16
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol16-No1-2
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Abstract:
This study examines the residential demand for electricity by time-of-use in Switzerland. For this purpose, an almost ideal demand system (AIDS) model for peak and off-peak electricity consumption is estimated using panel data coveting the years 1987 to 1990 and 21 cities. The empirical analysis characterizes the Swiss residential electricity market as rather price responsive. The own partial price elasticities are estimated to range between -1.29 and -1.50 during the peak period and between -2.36 and -2.42 during the off-peak period. These elasticities show a high responsiveness of electricity consumption to changes in peak and off-peak prices. Moreover, the positive values of the partial cross price elasticities and substitution elasticities show that peak and offpeak electricity are substitutes.



Household energy demand in Urban China: Accounting for regional prices and rapid income change

Jing Cao, Mun S. Ho, and Huifang Liang

Year: 2016
Volume: Volume 37
Number: China Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.37.SI1.jcao
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Abstract:
Understanding the rapidly rising demand for energy in China is essential to efforts to reduce the country's energy use and environmental damage. In response to rising incomes and changing prices and demographics, household use of various fuels, electricity and gasoline has changed dramatically in China. In this paper, we estimate both income and price elasticities for various energy types using Chinese urban household micro-data collected by National bureau of Statistics, by applying a two-stage budgeting AIDS model. We find that total energy is price and income inelastic for all income groups after accounting for demographic and regional effects. Our estimated electricity price elasticity ranges from - 0.49 to -0.57, gas price elasticity ranges from -0.46 to -0.94, and gasoline price elasticity ranges from -0.85 to -0.94. Income elasticity for various energy types range from 0.57 to 0.94. Demand for coal is most price and income elastic among the poor, whereas gasoline demand is elastic for the rich.





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