Search

Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

Search Results for All:
(Showing results 1 to 3 of 3)



Energy Conservation versus Supply Strategies: Implications for Industrial Policy

Bernard Bourgeois, Patrick Criqui, and Jacques Percebois

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-No3-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
Many strategies were developed by energy-importing countries to cope with oil shocks. Some mainly adapted to the new constraints of the energy environment and tried to make up for a relative disadvantage in the energy field by obtaining a relative advantage in industry or trade. The main effect of these adaptation strategies has been to offset growing energy deficits with steadily increasing industrial surpluses. On the other hand, other strategies were adopted which aimed above all at restructuring the domestic energy system through a voluntaristic policy of promoting domestic energy supply. In these cases, investment in the energy sector was given a high priority, sometimes at the expense of other industrial sectors.



Electricity Liberalization in the European Union: Balancing Benefits and Risks

Jacques Percebois

Year: 2008
Volume: Volume 29
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol29-No1-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
The electricity liberalization is contested by many European consumers who hold it responsible for the electricity price increase, but such a conclusion is questionable. As the various spot markets are connected, liberalization will imply a convergence of electricity prices for all European countries if any congestion is observed on the networks. We observe today that German gas power stations are often �marginal power stations�; thus the German spot market is often the price maker. High price for oil means high price for natural gas and indirectly high price for electricity. Moreover increasing interconnection of electricity markets leads to surplus transfers among European consumers and producers of electricity. But for some people the price increase observed today results also partly from a rise in the market power of electricity producers. This paper examines the position of the main European incumbents in this field.



Book Reviews

(Various)

Year: 2008
Volume: Volume 29
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol29-No1-8
No Abstract



Cross-subsidies Tied to the Introduction of Intermittent Renewable Electricity. An Analysis Based on a Model of the French Day-Ahead Market

Jacques Percebois and Stanislas Pommeret

Year: 2018
Volume: Volume 39
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.39.3.jper
View Abstract

Abstract:
The introduction of renewable energy paid off-market disrupts the demand-price relationship in wholesale electricity markets. Drawing on 2015 hourly data from France's electricity transmission network operator (RTE) and the French day-ahead spot market, this paper attempts to quantify the disturbance observed and the transfers of revenues among consumers, producers and providers. This study calculates, through a modeling of the day-ahead market, the impact on conventional electricity producers in France in terms of the loss of economic value owing to the introduction of renewable energies. In the same time consumers benefit from lower electricity prices but have to pay for feed-in tariffs. Renewable electricity producers and electricity providers are also the winners. An estimation of the cross-subsidies induced by the injection of renewable electricity is given.





Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

 

© 2021 International Association for Energy Economics | Privacy Policy | Return Policy