Search

Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

Search Results for All:
(Showing results 1 to 4 of 4)



U.S. Residential Demand for Wood

Richard R. Bryant

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No3-11
View Abstract

Abstract:
A recent nationwide survey estimated that approximately 20 million households in the United States use wood as a source of heating fuel and that about 30 percent of those use wood as their primary source of space heat.' In two studies of total wood energy consumption, the U.S. Department of Energy suggests that residential wood energy use declined from the turn of the century to the mid-1970s but increased by more than 130 percent from 1973 to 1980 and by another 8 percent from 1980 to 1983.2 These studies report that by 1983 wood provided about 9.6 percent of residential end-use energy consumption and approximately 14 percent of total household heating fuel consumption. Moreover, residential wood energy use is expected to continue to increase. The Office of Technology Assessment has projected a tripling of fuelwood use between 1979 and 2000 under a business as usual scenerio and almost a sevenfold increase with "vigorous support and high energy prices."



Traditional Energy Programs and the Theory of Open Access Forest Resources

Harry R. Clarke and Ram M. Shrestha

Year: 1989
Volume: Volume 10
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol10-No3-9
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper analyzes implications of open access forestry for traditional energy programs in LDC's. The role of improved woods loves, charcoal kilns, forest-access and biogas programs is examined. A key finding is that, with sufficient elasticity in fuelwood demands, traditional energy programs may reduce long-run fuel wood supply stocks.



Fuelwood Use in Urban Areas: A Case Study of Raipur, India

M. Macauley, M. Naimuddin, P.C. Agarwal, and J. Dunkerley

Year: 1989
Volume: Volume 10
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol10-No3-10
View Abstract

Abstract:
Concern over deforestation in developing countries has led to increased interest in fuelwood markets, particularly the major market in cooking fuels for urban populations. This case study of Raipur, India, examines the use of cooking fuels by households and small commercial users, with emphasis on the role of fuelwood. It finds that total cooking energy consumption per household (in Btus) is relatively constant over a wide range of household income. However, the composition of fuel supplies varies with income, from a low-efficiency wood-based system in poor households to a higher-efficiency LPG-based system in higher-income households. Consumers evince a strong preferen-e for modern fuels, supporting the general pattern of inferiority of traditional fuels and the transition to modern fuels with increasing incomes.



Traditional Energy Programs with an Open Access Forest Resource: Policy Implications

Hany R Clarke and Ram M. Shrestha

Year: 1989
Volume: Volume 10
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol10-No4-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
Policies for managing a forest subject to open access exploitation are discussed from the viewpoint of encouraging greater efficiency in the use of woodfuels. The usefulness of market and non-market policy options formanagingforestresources is shown to depend on whether fuelwood collection is the major cause of deforestation or not and, if so, whether fuelwood collection procedures have a market valuation.





Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

 

© 2022 International Association for Energy Economics | Privacy Policy | Return Policy