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No Book Review

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Year: 2009
Volume: Volume 30
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol30-NoSI-14
No Abstract



No Book Review

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Year: 2009
Volume: Volume 30
Number: Special Issue #2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol30-NoSI2-11
No Abstract



No Book Review

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Year: 2008
Volume: Volume 29
Number: Special Issue #2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol29-NoSI2-10
No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2018
Volume: Volume 39
Number: Number 1
DOI:
No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 6
DOI:
No Abstract



No Book Review

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Year: 2008
Volume: Volume 29
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol29-NoSI-9
No Abstract



No Book Review

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Year: 2006
Volume: Multi-Greenhouse Gas Mitigation and Climate Policy
Number: Special Issue #3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-VolSI2006-NoSI3-27
No Abstract



(No Book Reviews)

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Year: 2006
Volume: Endogenous Technological Change
Number: Special Issue #1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-VolSI2006-NoSI1-14
No Abstract



No Book Review

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Year: 2006
Volume: Hybrid Modeling
Number: Special Issue #2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-VolSI2006-NoSI2-10
No Abstract



No Book Review

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Year: 2010
Volume: Volume 31
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol31-NoSI-10
No Abstract



No Book Review

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Year: 2013
Volume: Volume 34
Number: Number 3
DOI:
No Abstract



Book Reviews

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Year: 2014
Volume: Volume 35
Number: Number 1
DOI:
No Abstract



No Book Review

Year: 2011
Volume: Volume 32
Number: Special Issue
DOI:
No Abstract



BOOK REVIEW

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Year: 2012
Volume: Volume 33
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol33-No1-9
No Abstract



No Book Review this Issue

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Year: 2012
Volume: Volume 33
Number: Number 3
DOI:
No Abstract



Book Reviews

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Year: 2014
Volume: Volume 35
Number: Number 2
DOI:
No Abstract



Foreword to the Special Issue on Renewables and Diversification in Heavily Energy Subsidized Economies

Carlo Andrea Bollino, David Hobbs, Lester C. Hunt, and Nora Nezamuddin

Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: KAPSARC Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.38.SI1.cbol
No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: KAPSARC Special Issue
DOI:
No Abstract



No Book Reviews

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Year: 2016
Volume: Volume 37
Number: China Special Issue
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No Abstract



No Book Reviews

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Year: 2015
Volume: Volume 36
Number: Adelman Special Issue
DOI:
No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 5
DOI:
No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 1
DOI:
No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 2
DOI:
No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 3
DOI:
No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 4
DOI:
No Abstract



Understanding Oil Price Dynamics and their Effects over Recent Decades: An Interview with James Hamilton

Fredj Jawadi

Year: 2018
Volume: Volume 40
Number: Special Issue 1
DOI:
View Abstract

Abstract:
The following interview with Prof. James Hamilton was conducted in April 2018 by Dr. Fredj Jawadi with the assistance of Professors James L. Smith and Adonis Yatchew during the 5th International Symposium in Computational Economics and Finance (ISCEF) held in Paris, France. The interview includes 21 questions related to oil price dynamics. The aim of the discussion was, first, to help the reader gain a better understanding of the factors driving changes in oil prices, second, to examine the impact of oil price shocks on the economy and, third, to understand the dynamics of oil prices in the future. The recent related literature on oil price uncertainty is also discussed. We hope that this interview will give the reader clearer insights into the causes and consequences of oil price change and its evolution over time.



America's Energy Choices - Presidential Address

Sam H. Schurr

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No1-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
In trying to decide on a topic for this address I found myself wavering between a talk that would review this first, eventful year in the life of our Association as opposed to a subject which would be more substantive in nature. Substance finally won out, partly be-cause of personal preference, and partly because of the advice of others. The remarkable progress of the Association is something we are all proud of, but I believe that it has been-and will continue to be-well documented in many ways familiar to all of us. The forth-coming appearance in the near future of the Association's own professional journal will be a signal event in the unfolding story of the Association's successful development.



Coal Policy and Energy Economics

Richard L. Gordon

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No1-8
View Abstract

Abstract:
With the flurry of legislation in 1977 further inhibiting coal consumption and production, it became apparent to many observers that coal had joined oil, gas, and nuclear energy as a tightly regulated industry. Since by now this observation has been widely dissemi-nated, it seems most appropriate here only to summarize the nature of the barriers and their obvious implications. Then emphasis can be placed on the perspectives that economic analyses can provide for evaluating the issues.



Energy Prices and the U.S.Economy in 1979-1981

Knut Anton Mork and Robert E. Hall

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No2-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
For the second time in the decade, the U.S. economy is absorbing a large sudden shock in the world price of oil. From late in 1978 to June 1979, OPEC raised the world price of oil by closeto $9 per barrel. Western industrial nations could face a repetition of the serious recession of 1974-75 on close to the same scale. The increase in the total cost of energy inputs induced by this oil price increase is about two-thirds of the increase in 1974. The potential disruption to the U.S. economy and others is a similar fraction of what occurred in the earlier episode.



Residential Substitution of Off-peak for Peak Electricity Usage under Time-of-Use Pricing

Douglas W. Caves and Laurits R. Christensen

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No2-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
This article reports on the methodology, procedures, and conclusions from the first phase of our econometric analysis of the Wisconsin Time-of-Use (TOU) Electricity Pricing Experiment.' Dur-ing Phase I, which took place during the summers of 1976 and 1977, we confined our attention to assessing consumer ability and/or willingness to shift electricity usage from peak to off-peak (P/OP)



Crude Oil Resource Appraisal in the United States

Noel D. Uri

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No3-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
Prior to the Arab oil embargo that began in October 1973, the general feeling was that U.S. oil resources were almost limitless. Certainly there were some who were aware that the rate of crude oil produc-tion was falling and costs were increasing, but these perceptions were relegated to the background. Past experience supported the explorer's optimistic outlook concerning potential discoveries. The United States never seemed in danger of being less than the world's foremost producer of crude oil.



The Real Price of Imported Oil

Joy Dunkerley and John E. Jankowski, Jr.

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No3-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
The continual upward adjustment since 1973 in international quoted oil prices has been accompanied by two countervailing developments. The first is the weakening of the dollar against many national currencies. Since transactions in the international oil market are conducted in dollars, many countries were able to offer less of their national currency for each dollar of oil purchased. Second, sharply rising prices of all other goods and services in many oil-importing coun-tries diminished the impact of the relative rise in oil prices. Thus oil appeared as only one of a host of rising prices, perhaps rising more strongly than other prices but otherwise indistinguishable from a multitude of inflationary pressures. In other words, the real price of oil to importing countries may not have been rising as strongly in real terms as is suggested by price quotations from internationally traded crude oil. If this is the case, pressures for limiting oil imports and oil conservation generally would be weakened.



Economic Implications of Mandated Efficiency in Standards for Household Appliances

J. Daniel Khazzoom

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No4-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
In the discussion of energy conservation, a great deal of attention has focused on mandated efficiency standards for cars and energy-using household appliances. (In this article, I will use the term "appliance" in a generic sense to cover household durables). Unfortunately, the estimates of energy savings predicted to result from these mandated standards are derived mechanically.' When mandated standards raise the appliance efficiency by 1 percent, demand is predicted to drop by 1 percent; when they raise efficiency by 2 percent, demand is predicted to drop by 2 percent; and so on. Examples of such results are found in reports by the Department of Energy (1979a, 1980) and by the Staff of the California Energy Commission (1979) on energy demand in California in the coming two decades.



The Treatment of Intermediate Materialsin the Estimation of the Demand for Energy: The Case of U.S. Manufacturing, 1947-1971

Richard G. Anderson

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No4-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
Continuing increases in the price of energy have stimulated extensive research on energy demand and factor substitution in the U.S. economy. The manufacturing segment of the U.S. economy consumes approximately one-fourth of aggregate U.S. energy if measured by Btu consumption, and about 40 percent if measured by the Btu content of the fuel used for electric power generation (see Table 1). Hence, the manufacturing sector has been specifically targeted as a source of potential reductions in energy demand in the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975,This paper was completed while the author was Assistant Professor of Economics at Michigan State University. Acknowledgment is given to Ernst Berndt, Robert Engle,Franklin Fisher. Jerry Hausman, James Johannes, Robert Pindyck, and Robert Rasche for helpful comments. The author retains responsibility for errors.



The U.S. Outlook for Supplemental Gas

Arlon R. Tussing

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No1-7
View Abstract

Abstract:
Current forecasts of natural gas demand in the United States through the turn of the century are lower than projections made only a few years ago, and fall far short of the volumes the economy is technically capable of absorbing even with its existing stock of energy-using equipment.




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