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The Demand for Electricity Services and the Quality of Supply

Romesh Dias-Bandaranaike and Mohan Munasinghe

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No2-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
The spiraling costs of energy within the last decade have stimulated renewed interest in the increased efficiency of energy production and consumption.' Electricity is a relatively mature sector where considerable theoretical work on the economic aspects has been carried out since the 1950s.2 While the microeconomic principles underlying optimal investment planning and pricing policy have received much attention in the recent literature, less effort has been devoted to the effects of quality of supplyand output reliability.



Long-Term Versus Short-Term Costs of Electricity Supply Interruptions: A Cautionary Note

Peter Lewin and Steve G. Parsons

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No2-13
View Abstract

Abstract:
Increasing attention has been given in recent years to the valuation of reliability in the supply of electricity. It is peculiar in the use of the terms that the value of reliability is equivalent to the cost of unreliability. In attempting to identify and measure this cost, researchers have drawn a distinction between different types of cost, particularly short- and long-term costs. In this paper, we examine this distinction to clarify what may be a source of confusion.



Long-run Adjustment to Alternative Levels of Reliability in Electricity Supply

Robert W. Gilmer and Richard S. Mack

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No4-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
Most studies of reliable electricity supplies have been artful efforts to quantify the benefits of additional electric generating capacity (Webb; Andersson and Taylor). Outages are treated as the result of insufficient capacity, and outage costs are weighed against whatever outlays are necessary to bring new generation into the electrical system. Given the emphasis on long-run supply in the ultimate usefulness of these studies, research has focused to a remarkable degree on the cost of individual outage events (Sanghvi, 1982). The customer's long-run response to a change in reliability levels has rarely received much attention, and when it has been considered it has been treated as an analytically difficult or intractable problem. Our purpose is to show that the economics of long-run adjustments to a different level of reliability are in fact quite simple and easily incorporated into standard cost/benefit studies.



Reliability of Electricity Supply, Outage Costs and Value of Service: An Overview

M. Munasinghe and A. Sanghvi

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Special Issue 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-NoSI2-1
No Abstract





Priority Service: Market Structure and Competition

Hung-po Chao, Shmuel S. Oren, Stephen A. Smith, and Robert B. Wilson

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Special Issue 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-NoSI2-6
No Abstract



Estimating Household Value of Electrical Service Reliability with Market Research Data

Andrew A. Goett, Daniel L. McFadden and Chi-Keung Woo

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Special Issue 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-NoSI2-7
No Abstract



Capacity Rationing and Fixed Cost Collection

Chi-Keung Woo

Year: 1991
Volume: Volume 12
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol12-No2-9
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Abstract:
This paper proposes a simple load management program with a two-part tariff to ration an electric utility's installed capacity and to collect its fixed costs under asymmetric information and demand uncertainty. Because of its simplicity, the program is a practical alternative to spot pricing and rationing schemes with highly nonlinear rate structures.



Onsite Backup Generation and Interruption Insurance for Electricity Distribution

Joseph A. Doucet and Shinuel S. Oren

Year: 1991
Volume: Volume 12
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol12-No4-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper extends recent work on interruption insurance for electric power by introducing onsite backup generation capacity as a supplementary form of interruption insurance. The basic model of interruption insurance as a mechanism for differential pricing is reviewed, the incentive for providing onsite backup generation capacity is demonstrated and the interaction between onsite backup generation and interruption insurance is analyzed. Two types of onsite backup, customer and utility owned, are discussed. It is shown that individuals' economic incentives to install onsite backup generation dominate the utility's incentive. Hence customer owned onsite backup decisions will pre-empt the utility's plan to mitigate compensation payments by providing onsite backup generation.



Integrated Local Transmission and Distribution Planning Using Customer Outage Costs

Greg Ball, Debra Lloyd-Zannetti, Brian Horii, Dan Birch, Robert E. Ricks, and Holly Lively

Year: 1997
Volume: Volume 18
Number: Distributed Resources: Toward a New Paradigm of the Electricity Business
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol18-NoSI-7
View Abstract

Abstract:
Changing regulatory incentives in the electric power industry are forcing utility transmission and distribution (T&D) planners to change their approach to investment planning. To minimize the risk of over-investment, utilities need to perform an analysis of system capacity limitations which goes beyond traditional peak load and temperature planning, and routinely consider a variety of alternate incremental capacity expansion measures. Existing engineering tools are inadequate for determining the potential cost advantage of deferring an expansion, or for evaluating the net benefits of distributed resources (DR). Conversely, integrated resource planning (IRP) tools often underestimate or ignore important DR siting restrictions and operational impacts. This paper describes a process to identify T&D capacity constraints, evaluate conventional and alternative capacity additions and DR applications, and explore the risk of operating beyond limits imposed by current reliability practices. The process uses hourly load-flow information to quantify the total annual energy and customer outage costs. The same information is used to build plans incorporating and dispatching DR where they have the greatest impact on minimizing expansion needs. A detailed case study demonstrates the process by quantifying the economic benefits of deferring an expansion with a do-nothing plan. The study reveals both unforeseen advantages and impracticalities of DR use.




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