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Air Quality Implications of a Nuclear Moratorium: An Alternative Analysis

Anthony Bopp, Verne Loose

Year: 1981
Volume: Volume 2
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol2-No3-4
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Abstract:
The role of nuclear power in the nation's energy future is and probably will continue to be one of the principal energy policy issues in the United States. Relatively inexpensive coal reserves and escalating costs of light water reactors have eroded a once-large cost advantage enjoyed by nuclear technologies. While the relative cost advantage of nuclear over coal electric power has become a subject of debate, other less concrete issues have surfaced and often overshadow economic arguments. Antinuclear "forces" generally view the technology as the essence of what they consider wrong with modern technological society. Pronuclear "forces" counter that much fear associated with nuclear power derives from the newness of the technology and that the air quality and possible economic gains associated with nuclear power make it the preferable choice for future electricity generation.



Effects of Carbon Mitigation on Co-pollutants at Industrial Facilities in Europe

Klara Zwickl, Simon Sturn, James K. Boyce

Year: 2021
Volume: Volume 42
Number: Number 5
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.42.5.kzwi
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Abstract:
In addition to global climate benefits, carbon mitigation improves local air quality by reducing emissions of hazardous co-pollutants. Using data on large industrial point sources in Europe, we estimate how changes in carbon dioxide emissions affect emissions of the three co-pollutants SOX, NOX, and PM10 for samples of 630 to 2,400 facilities for the years 2007 to 2015. We find substantial and statistically significant co-pollutant elasticities of about 1.0 for SOX, 0.9 for NOX, and 0.7 for PM10. These elasticities vary by economic activity, and are substantially higher for the production of energy. For climate policy-induced CO2 emission reductions we find elasticities in the energy sector of 1.2 to 1.8 for SOX, 1.1 to 1.5 for NOX, and 0.8 for PM10. Using these estimates to calculate monetary air quality co-benefits suggests that conventional European Environmental Agency estimates of carbon damages that omit co-benefits significantly underestimate the benefits of carbon mitigation.



Governance, Environmental Vulnerability, and PM2.5 Concentrations: International Evidence

Thai-Ha Le, Youngho Chang, and Donghyun Park

Year: 2021
Volume: Volume 42
Number: Number 6
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.42.6.thle
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Abstract:
We extend the EKC framework to examine the role of governance quality and environmental vulnerability in PM2.5 concentrations using a global panel dataset of 128 countries between 2000 and 2014. The results show that governance and education reduce PM2.5 concentrations while environmental vulnerability increases the concentrations. Promoting good governance and education as well as reducing environmental vulnerability can thus contribute to cleaner air. We find qualitatively similar results for the sub-sample of high-income countries, but governance has relatively weaker or insignificant effects for the sub-samples of upper-middle-income and lower-middle-and-low-income countries. High-income countries have strong institutional frameworks that facilitate enforcement of environmental regulations, which are conducive for protecting air quality, whereas other countries have relatively weak institutional capacity. This suggests a need for substantial economic, technological, and financial support from the international community for strengthening the environmental institutional capacity of developing countries.





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