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No Book Review

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Year: 2009
Volume: Volume 30
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol30-NoSI-14
No Abstract



No Book Review

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Year: 2009
Volume: Volume 30
Number: Special Issue #2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol30-NoSI2-11
No Abstract



No Book Review

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Year: 2008
Volume: Volume 29
Number: Special Issue #2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol29-NoSI2-10
No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2018
Volume: Volume 39
Number: Number 1
DOI:
No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 6
DOI:
No Abstract



No Book Review

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Year: 2008
Volume: Volume 29
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol29-NoSI-9
No Abstract



No Book Review

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Year: 2006
Volume: Multi-Greenhouse Gas Mitigation and Climate Policy
Number: Special Issue #3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-VolSI2006-NoSI3-27
No Abstract



(No Book Reviews)

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Year: 2006
Volume: Endogenous Technological Change
Number: Special Issue #1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-VolSI2006-NoSI1-14
No Abstract



No Book Review

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Year: 2006
Volume: Hybrid Modeling
Number: Special Issue #2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-VolSI2006-NoSI2-10
No Abstract



No Book Review

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Year: 2010
Volume: Volume 31
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol31-NoSI-10
No Abstract



No Book Review

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Year: 2013
Volume: Volume 34
Number: Number 3
DOI:
No Abstract



Book Reviews

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Year: 2014
Volume: Volume 35
Number: Number 1
DOI:
No Abstract



No Book Review

Year: 2011
Volume: Volume 32
Number: Special Issue
DOI:
No Abstract



BOOK REVIEW

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Year: 2012
Volume: Volume 33
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol33-No1-9
No Abstract



No Book Review this Issue

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Year: 2012
Volume: Volume 33
Number: Number 3
DOI:
No Abstract



Book Reviews

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Year: 2014
Volume: Volume 35
Number: Number 2
DOI:
No Abstract



Foreword to the Special Issue on Renewables and Diversification in Heavily Energy Subsidized Economies

Carlo Andrea Bollino, David Hobbs, Lester C. Hunt, and Nora Nezamuddin

Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: KAPSARC Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.38.SI1.cbol
No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: KAPSARC Special Issue
DOI:
No Abstract



No Book Reviews

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Year: 2016
Volume: Volume 37
Number: China Special Issue
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No Abstract



No Book Reviews

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Year: 2015
Volume: Volume 36
Number: Adelman Special Issue
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No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 5
DOI:
No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 1
DOI:
No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 2
DOI:
No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 3
DOI:
No Abstract



Front & Back Matter

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Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 4
DOI:
No Abstract



Understanding Oil Price Dynamics and their Effects over Recent Decades: An Interview with James Hamilton

Fredj Jawadi

Year: 2018
Volume: Volume 40
Number: Special Issue 1
DOI:
View Abstract

Abstract:
The following interview with Prof. James Hamilton was conducted in April 2018 by Dr. Fredj Jawadi with the assistance of Professors James L. Smith and Adonis Yatchew during the 5th International Symposium in Computational Economics and Finance (ISCEF) held in Paris, France. The interview includes 21 questions related to oil price dynamics. The aim of the discussion was, first, to help the reader gain a better understanding of the factors driving changes in oil prices, second, to examine the impact of oil price shocks on the economy and, third, to understand the dynamics of oil prices in the future. The recent related literature on oil price uncertainty is also discussed. We hope that this interview will give the reader clearer insights into the causes and consequences of oil price change and its evolution over time.



Oil and Gas Supply Modeling under Uncertainty: Putting DOE Midterm Forecasts in Perspective

Carl M. Harris

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
The original purpose of this study was to examine the midterm projections of oil and gas production generated by the 1979 version of the Department of Energy's Midterm Oil and Gas Supply Modeling System (MOGSMS) for the 1979 Annual Report to Congress.q These forecasts applied to conventional oil and gas, onshore and offshore, in the lower 48 states from 1985 to 1995, inclusive. The specific objective of the work was to quantify the sensitivity of these projections to potential uncertainty in some of the model's key elements. But more generally, this exercise is viewed as but one good example of how to estimate the uncertainty in forecasts coming from a large computer-based model.



Nuclear Construction Lead Times: Analysis of Past Trends and Outlook for the Future

Marcy A. Radlauer, David S. Bauman, and. Stephen W. Chapel

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No1-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
Cost, duration, and other uncertainties of nuclear construction have recently been in the forefront of the news. Tales of mismanagement, inconsistent quality assurance, and utility financial woes have prompted many to ask why it takes so long and costs so much to build a nuclear power plant, and what the outlook is for plants currently under construction.



A Decision Analysis Approach to Energy System Expansion Planning

James P. Peerenboom and Wesley K. Foell

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
Capacity expansion decisions are critically important to both public and private-sector energy suppliers as well as regional and national energy planning agencies. Simplistically stated, planning for the expansion of an energy supply system involves determining when and where new energy production facilities of various types and sizes should be deployed to meet projected demands. As with most energy-related decision problems, several factors complicate capacity expansion planning. These factors include the involvement of multiple decisionmakers and interest groups, uncertainties about technology costs and demand projections, varying degrees of risk associated with alternative energy technologies, the need to consider costs and effects over long time horizons, and the difficulty of quantifying key impacts and concerns.





Improving Long-Term Investment Decisions under Uncertainty: Applications for the Swedish Energy Sector

Per Anders Bergendahl, Lars Brigelius, and Peter Rosen

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-No2-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
The oil price shocks in the 1970s illuminated the vulnerability of modern economies when all planning assumes everything to be going on just as usual. How is it then possible to insure against events such as oil price shocks? What will it cost and what will be the return? These are the central issues in this paper.



Flexibility Benefits of Demand-Side Programsin Electric Utility Planning

Eric Hirst

Year: 1990
Volume: Volume 11
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol11-No1-13
View Abstract

Abstract:
Electric utilities face a variety of uncertainties that complicate their long-term resource planning and acquisition. Many utilities deal with these uncertainties by pursuing flexible strategies that allow changes to be made incrementally with little difficulty and at low cost. Thus, utilities today avoid construction of large, baseload power plants because of their long construction times and high capital costs. On the other hand, utilities view combustion turbines as flexible because they have small unit sizes, take only a few years to build, are inexpensive, and can later be converted to combined-cycle units (to increase capacity and improve performance). Energy-efficiency and load-management programs, because of their inherently small unit size and opportunities to adjust participation over time, are attractive for the same reasons.



Comments on Manne and Richels: "CO2 Emission Limits: An Economic Analysis for the USA"

William W. Hogan

Year: 1990
Volume: Volume 11
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol11-No2-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper evaluates the Global 2100 model application on global warming by A. S. Manne and R G. Richels, which is presented in this edition of The Energy Journal The paper discusses Manne and Richels's general analytical framework, the Global 2100 model; and Manne and Richels's exploration of international interdependence, benefit calculations, and the uncertainty which must necessarily accrue to any discussion of global warming. The paper suggests that cost-benefit analyses, such as the one provided by Manne and Richels, are necessary for policy recommendations. Differences in regional impacts of global warming are noted. The paper concludes that Manne and Richels's study is very worthwhile and pleads for further studies.



Chapter 15 - Managing Qualified Nuclear Decommissioning Trust Funds Under Uncertainty

Howard Hiller

Year: 1991
Volume: Volume 12
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol12-NoSI-15
View Abstract

Abstract:
Funds for the eventual decommissioning and removal of nuclear power plants are accumulating. The amount will total many tens, perhaps hundreds of billions, of dollars. One of the ingredients in setting aside these funds is managing them so as to assure that just enough cash is on hand at the time of decommissioning to meet all required expenses at the lowest possible net present value cost to utility ratepayers. As with any investment, there can be a variety of opinions. For this reason, it is important to consult several sources for advice on the investment of such nuclear decommissioning trust funds (NDTs). The next three chapters provide such advice from the perspective of three different firms. The first, by Howard Hiller, stresses the importance of an adaptive approach, pointing out that the most difficult question is the choice of investment maturities. Hiller employs a simulation methodology to quantify the riskcost characteristics of strategies along the maturity spectrum--from short to long-term. He identifies some of the unique uncertainties inherent in decommissioning and brings these uncertainties into his analysis. He concludes that the steepness of the municipal yield curve can be exploited even in the presence of inflationary uncertainty.



Chapter 18 - Confronting Uncertainty: Contingency Planning for Decommissioning

Bruce Biewald and Stephen Bernow

Year: 1991
Volume: Volume 12
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol12-NoSI-18
View Abstract

Abstract:
Contingency factors are a standard ingredient in all types of estimated costs. The actual contingency figure used, however, is always open to question. Given the absence of large-scale decommissioning projects, the long future time reference, the history of early shutdowns, and possibility of accidents, there continues to be a substantial controversy regarding the contingency level that is most appropriate. In this chapter, Bruce Biewald and Stephen Bernow present a critical review of the matter of contingency factors, arguing that current common levels in the neighborhood of 25 percent are too low.




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