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Taxation of Oil and Gas Revenues of Four Countries

John Helliwell, Philip K. Verleger, Jr., John Mitchell, Thomas R. Stauffer, James S. Moose, John F. Helliwell

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No2-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
Energy taxation is more complex and more controversial in Canada than in most or all other countries, for three main reasons. First, under the constitution, most natural resources are owned by the provinces, with important powers of regulation and taxation in the hands of the provincial and federal governments. Second, energy resources are very unevenly distributed among the provinces. Alberta, with less than 10 percent of Canada's population, accounts for 85 percent of Canada's nonfrontier onshore crude oil and natural gas. Finally, the Canadian oil and gas industry is largely foreign-owned and foreign-controlled.



The Rate of Return Earned by Lessees under Cash Bonus Bidding for OCS Oil and Gas Leases

Walter J. Mead, Asbjorn Moseidjord, and Philip E. Sorensen

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
The remaining oil and gas reserves and resources of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) represent one of America's largest publicly owned assets. Through 1980, OCS oil and gas leases had produced $62.8 billion in gross revenue and $41.3 billion in bonus, royalty, and rental payments to the federal government (U.S. Geological Survey, 1981).



Oil and Gas Supply Modeling under Uncertainty: Putting DOE Midterm Forecasts in Perspective

Carl M. Harris

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-4
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Abstract:
The original purpose of this study was to examine the midterm projections of oil and gas production generated by the 1979 version of the Department of Energy's Midterm Oil and Gas Supply Modeling System (MOGSMS) for the 1979 Annual Report to Congress.q These forecasts applied to conventional oil and gas, onshore and offshore, in the lower 48 states from 1985 to 1995, inclusive. The specific objective of the work was to quantify the sensitivity of these projections to potential uncertainty in some of the model's key elements. But more generally, this exercise is viewed as but one good example of how to estimate the uncertainty in forecasts coming from a large computer-based model.



Nationalizing Oil in the 1970s

Dean Goodermote and Richard B. Mancke

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
National oil companies emerged during the 1970s as an important force within both oil-exporting and oil-importing countries. By 1980 they were producing and marketing well over half the crude oil available for sale on world markets. These oil companies prospered within oil-exporting countries as events increasingly confirmed that the principal source of economic power in the oil business was sovereign control over oil reserves rather than private control over technical, managerial, and capital resources. During the 1970s, many oil-exporting countries sought to exploit their new-found market strength and exercise greater control over their oil industry either by building up existing government-owned oil companies or by seizing the opportunity to create new ones.



Canadian Oil and Gas Taxation

Campbell Watkins and Brian Scarfe

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-NoSI-3
No Abstract



An Analysis of Fiscal and Financial Impediments to Oil and Gas Exploration in Developing Countries

Charles R. Blitzer, Panos E. Cavoulacos, Donald R. Lessard, and James L. Paddock

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-NoSI-6
No Abstract





Severance Taxes and the Government's Share of Value from Oil and Gas Production

John Lohrenz and John A. Pederson

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-NoSI-17
No Abstract





International Energy Policy: The Conflict of Investment Needs and Market Signals

Paul Tempest

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No2-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
I am delighted to have the privilege to welcome you to this, our sixth annual North American Conference, here in San Francisco today. By some curious coincidence we have elected to meet on the very day, November 6th, when in the United States you are making the most important world leadership decision of the decade. Today, the rest of the world will be watching to see whether the U.S. electorates will endorse, inter alia, the deregulation of oil and gas and the underlying reliance on market forces to produce acceptable energy solutions for national security.Energy security, then, and the role of government is the theme I have chosen today, as I believe it still lies very much at the heart of the current energy debate. Can our energy systems survive and prosper? To what extent are volatile markets or irresponsible governments likely to mess them up? In this I conclude that, while on resource and production cost grounds, the Arabian Gulf still presents a neglected opportunity and Western Europe a neglected risk, the greatest danger lies in the United States' imposing its highly market-oriented energy logic on the rest of the world.




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