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Reducing the Economic Impacts of Oil Supply Interruptions: An International Perspective

Henry S. Rowen, John P. Weyant

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No1-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
Several circumstances could lead to deep and extended interruptions of the world's supply of oil during the 1980s. The range of potential interruptions includes those on the scale experienced in 1973-74 and 1979-80 but is not limited to them. Much deeper and longer interruptions may occur or be threatened.



Comment on International Energy Agency's World Energy Outlook

David M. Kline and John P. Weyant

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-8
No Abstract



Acknowledgments

n/a

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-9
No Abstract



Volume 4 Index

n/a

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-10
No Abstract





Notes - The Real Price of Imported Oil Revisited

Michael J. Coda and John E. Jankowski, Jr.

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-7
No Abstract



Canadian Natural Gas Exports to the United States: A Monopolistic Intertemporal Analysis

Terrence E. Daniel, Henry M. Goldberg, and John P. Weyant

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No4-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
The appropriate level and pricing of energy exports to the United States have been actively debated aspects of Canadian public policy for many years. In particular, natural gas export levels and prices have been subject to the ebb and flow of public opinion over the past two decades as Canada has gone through cycles of apparent excess and short supply. Canada perennially faces the difficult task of trading off the large potential revenues that can be derived from using its natural gas resources for current gas exports against the value of conserving them for future domestic use. Such an evaluation depends critically on factors that are uncertain and preferences that are intertemporal. It must also take into account that domestic prices in Canada are not determined in a competitive market.



Electricity Growth in the Future

Stephen C. Peck and John P. Weyant

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No1-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
Electricity demand in the United States declined in 1974 after over twenty years of sustained growth. By 1976, the growth rate was back up to 5 percent, but since then it has eroded steadily, with demand in 1982 slightly less than in 1981. This paper provides a simple way to understand these trends in electricity demand and to project futuredevelopments.



Book Review - The Economics of Energy Self-Sufficiency

Richard L. Gordon

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No2-14
No Abstract







Book Review - U.K. Energy, Structure, Prospects, and Policies

Richard L. Gordon

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No2-16
No Abstract



A North American Gas Trade Model (GTM)

Mark A. Beltramo, Alan S. Manne, and John P. Weyant

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No3-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
Natural gas ranks second only to crude oil as a primary source of energy in North America, During recent years, gas has satisfied 25 percent of all energy requirements in the United States. Most of this gas has been produced domestically, but 5 to 10 percent has been supplied by pipeline imports from Canada and Mexico. Additional amounts could be provided by pipelines from Alaska or by LNG (liquefied natural gas) imports from overseas, but these facilities would be expensive, and their construction continues to be delayed. Transport costs are high, and geography plays a far more important role in international gas markets than in the oil markets. For this reason, we view the North American continent as a largely self-contained system.



Overview of EMF-21: Multigas Mitigation and Climate Policy

John P. Weyant, Francisco C. de la Chesnaye, and Geoff J. Blanford

Year: 2006
Volume: Multi-Greenhouse Gas Mitigation and Climate Policy
Number: Special Issue #3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-VolSI2006-NoSI3-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
Overview of EMF-21: Multigas Mitigation and Climate Policy. By John P. Weyant*, Francisco C. de la Chesnaye**, and Geoff J. Blanford***



Introduction to EMF 24

Allen A. Fawcett, Leon E. Clarke, and John P. Weyant

Year: 2014
Volume: Volume 35
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.35.SI1.1
No Abstract



Technology and U.S. Emissions Reductions Goals: Results of the EMF 24 Modeling Exercise

Leon E. Clarke, Allen A. Fawcett, John P. Weyant, James McFarland, Vaibhav Chaturvedi, and Yuyu Zhou

Year: 2014
Volume: Volume 35
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.35.SI1.2
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper presents an overview of the study design and the results of the EMF 24 U.S. Technology Scenarios. The EMF 24 U.S. Technology Scenarios engaged nine top energy-environment-economy models to examine the implications of technological improvements and technological availability for reducing U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 50% and 80% by 2050. The study confirms that mitigation at the 50% or 80% level will require a dramatic transformation of the energy system over the next 40 years. The study also corroborates the result of previous studies that there is a large variation among models in terms of which energy strategy is considered most cost-effective. Technology assumptions are found to have a large influence on carbon prices and economic costs of mitigation. Keywords: Technology, scenarios, climate change



Overview of EMF 24 Policy Scenarios

Allen A. Fawcett, Leon C. Clarke, Sebastian Rausch, and John P. Weyant

Year: 2014
Volume: Volume 35
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.35.SI1.3
View Abstract

Abstract:
The Energy Modeling Forum 24 study included a set of policy scenarios designed to compare economy wide market-based and sectoral regulatory approaches of potential U.S. climate policy. Models from seven teams participated in this part of the study assessing economy-wide cap-and-trade climate policy and sectoral policies in the transportation and electric sector in terms of potential greenhouse gas emissions reductions, economic cost, and energy systems implications. This paper presents an overview of the results from the U.S. policy scenarios, and provides insights into the comparison of results from the participating models. In particular, various metrics were used to compare the model results including allowance price, the efficient frontier, consumption loss, GDP loss, and equivalent variation. We find that the choice of economic metric is an important factor in the comparison of model results. Among the insights, we note that the carbon price should cautiously be considered when other non-cap sectoral policies affecting emissions are assumed in tandem. We also find that a transportation sector policy is consistently shown to be inefficient compared to an economy-wide capand-trade policy with a comparable level of emissions reductions. Keywords: Climate policy, Energy-economy modeling, Sectoral climate policies, Policy interaction




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