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(Showing results 1 to 7 of 7)



A Critique of the IIASA Energy Models

Dennis Meadows

Year: 1981
Volume: Volume 2
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol2-No3-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
Of the several hundred seminars and meetings that have been held by the IIASA Energy Systems Program since its inception in 1973, one still stands out in the minds of many people at the Institute. In the winter of 1977, Amory Lovins visited Laxenburg; he was invited to deliver a seminar on soft energy paths and to discuss interim results of the IIASA energy project with Dr. Wolf Hafele, founder and director of the Program and its dominant intellectual and administrative figure since its initiation.



The Supply, Demand, and Average Price of Natural Gas under Free-Market Conditions

Jack W. Wilkinson

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No1-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
Editor's note: The following paper is of particular interest because the model it summarizes is based an a market equilibration process that generates gas prices differently than the models discussed in our special issue on gas deregulation (October 1982). It should be pointed out that while this paper was reviewed by a panel of expert readers, it has not undergone the anonymous refereeing process that is standard for scholarly papers published in The Energy Journal.



A Note on Rowen and Weyant,"Reducing the Economic Impacts of Oil Supply Interruptions: An International Perspective"

Harry D. Saunders

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No4-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
Henry Rowen and John Weyant (1982) commit the classic error of trying to answer an important policy question with tools that do not fit the job. Nor does their care in attaching explicit caveats to their conclusions overcome the fact that the limitations of their approach are serious.The question of oil supply disruptions and their potential economic impact is indeed important, and it remains so despite slack oil markets. Policymakers may yet be faced with situations that require them to decide quickly on the advisability of emergency tariffs and other such measures; and they will need reasonable assurances that the caveats analysts attach to policy recommendations do not overwhelm the recommendations themselves. Just such a danger is inherent in the inappropriate application of models and the application of inappropriate models.



Changing Climate and Energy Modeling: A Review

John Reilly and Jae Edmonds

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-13
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



The Cost of Capital: Estimating the Rate of Return for Public Utilities

Donna Smith

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-14
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



The Regulation of Public Utilities: Theory and Practice

Richard L. Gordon

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-15
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



Coal's Contribution to U.K. Self-Sufficiency

Richard L. Gordon

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-16
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



Electricity's Contribution to U.K. Self-Sufficiency

Richard L. Gordon

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-17
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



Oil's Contribution to U.K. Self-Sufficiency

Richard L. Gordon

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-18
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



America's Electric Utilities: Past, Present, and Future

Harry M. Trebing

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-19
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



The Politics of Middle Eastern Oil

Dankwart A. Rustow

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-21
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



Reforming the Regulation of Electric Utilities

Lester P. Taylor

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-22
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



Markets for Power: An Analysis for Electric Utility Deregulation

Milton Z. Kafoglis

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-20
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



Energy Today and Tomorrow

William A. Vogely

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-23
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



Methodological Advances in Energy Modelling: 1970-1990

James M. Griffin

Year: 1993
Volume: Volume 14
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol14-No1-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
Both the theory and practice of energy modelling have made phenomenal advances over the last 20 years. After providing a brief description of the state of energy modelling circa 1970, this paper identifies four major methodological advances profoundly affecting energy modelling. In the area of energy demand modelling, the translog and other generalized functional forms have proven readily adaptable to questions of interfuel substitution and energy/non-energy substitution. Additionally, discrete choice models, particularly the multinomial logit models, have provided a conceptually appealing framework within which to model appliance choice. The third advance has come in both the frequency and sophistication of use of panel data sets, which offer a much richer set of price and income variation. Finally, in the area of energy supply modelling, dynamic optimization models coupled with greater reliance on engineering information has lead to steady improvements in this area.



Improving Long-Range Energy Modeling: A Plea for Historical Retrospectives

Jonathan Koomey, Paul Craig, Ashok Gadgil and David Lorenzetti

Year: 2003
Volume: Volume24
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol24-No4-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
One of the most striking things about forecasters is their lack of historical perspective. They rarely do retrospectives, even though looking back at past work can both illuminate the reasons for its success or failure, and improve the methodologies of current and future forecasts. One of the best and most famous retrospectives is that by Hans Landsberg, which investigates work conducted by Landsberg, Sam Schurr, and others. In this article, written mainly for model users, we highlight Landsberg s retrospective as a uniquely valuable contribution to improving forecasting methodologies. We also encourage model users to support such retrospectives more frequently. Finally, we give the current generation of analysts the kind of guidance we believe Landsberg and Sam Schurr would have offered about how to do retrospectives well.



Markets versus Regulation: The Efficiency and Distributional Impacts of U.S. Climate Policy Proposals

Sebastian Rausch and Valerie J. Karplus

Year: 2014
Volume: Volume 35
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.35.SI1.11
View Abstract

Abstract:
Regulatory measures have proven the favored approach to climate change mitigation in the U.S., while market-based policies have gained little traction. Using a model that resolves the U.S. economy by region, income category, and sector-specific technology deployment opportunities, this paper studies the magnitude and distribution of economic impacts under regulatory versus market-based approaches. We quantify heterogeneity in the national response to regulatory policies, including a fuel economy standard and a clean or renewable electricity standard, and compare these to a cap-and-trade system targeting carbon dioxide or all greenhouse gases. We find that the regulatory policies substantially exceed the cost of a cap-and-trade system at the national level. We further show that the regulatory policies yield large cost disparities across regions and income groups, which are exaggerated by the difficulty of implementing revenue recycling provisions under regulatory policy designs. Keywords: Energy modeling, Climate policy, Regulatory policies, Electricity, Transportation, General Equilibrium Modeling





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