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Expansio ad Absurdum

Amory Lovins

Year: 1981
Volume: Volume 2
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol2-No4-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
In 1977 I had the pleasure of Wolf Hafele's hospitality atIIASA while writing Soft Energy Paths. I have since been followinghis group's activities and looking forward to seeing what their protracted and costly energy study might produce. Already being extensively publicized as a careful, comprehensive, and objective assessment of long-term energy options, valuable for both policy makers and their constituents, the IIASA study is being given considerablecredence by the credulous, and often the benefit of the doubt by those too busy, bemused, or inexpert to dig into its bulky technical details.



Energy in a Finite World-Expansio ad Absurdum? A Rebuttal

Wolf Hafele

Year: 1981
Volume: Volume 2
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol2-No4-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
In commenting on the IIASA global energy study, Amory Lovins (1981) implicitly maintains that only those who hold his extreme views are objective. If not, the analyst is dismissed as being subjective, of low technical ability, and mindless. A scrutiny of Lovins's highly repetitive statements reveals that he is essentially saying two things.



Will President Reagan's Energy Policy Lead Households to Conserve?

Eric S. Brown

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No1-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
When energy was cheap and easily available, consumers' paid little attention to their energy use and bills, so after the supply disruptions of the1970s, they were poorly equipped to deal with the changes they faced in energy prices and availability. During the 1970s, the federal government undertook various programs of education and assistance, including dissemination of printed information, establishment of energy standards for federally financed homes, and tax credits for use of alternative energy sources.









Notes - Risk Analysis of Alternative Energy Sources

Daniel R. Kazmer

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No1-11
No Abstract



Reply to "Risk Analysis of Alternative Energy Sources"

Miller B. Spangler

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No1-12
No Abstract



Wood Energy Bibliography

n/a

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No1-13
No Abstract





Notes - Comment on "Economic Implications of Mandated Efficiency..."

Stanley M. Besen and Leland L. Johnson

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No1-9
No Abstract



The Simple Economics of Industrial Cogeneration

Paul L. Joskow and Donald R. Jones

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No1-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
Rising energy prices and dependence on insecure supplies of foreign petroleum have led energy consumers and energy policymakers to seek methods to use energy more efficiently. Industrial cogeneration has frequently been seen as such a method. By generating electricity in conjunction with the production of steam for industrial processes, less energy is used than when process steam and electricity are produced separately. Most recent U.S. energy policy studies have spoken favorably about the potential for cogeneration.' Some specific studies have indicated opportunities to replace central station electric power generation with industrial cogeneration capacity, and, in the process, to reduce domestic energy consumption substantially.



Energy-Output Coefficients: Complex Realities Behind Simple Ratios

G. C. Watkins and E. R. Berndt

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No2-8
View Abstract

Abstract:
The demand for energy is a derived demand, since it is transmitted from demands for goods and services that incorporate energy as an input. Trends in the ratio of energy consumption to the level of output the so-called energy coefficient-are often used to examine energy demand in the industrial and other demand sectors.' In a market economy, the inference of this approach is that at a time of increasing energy prices, a rise in the energy coefficient is an indication of waste and inefficiency or of a perverse price response. Correspondingly, a fall in the energy coefficient is evidence of the efficacy of the price mechanism and government regulations inpromoting energy conservation.



Effectiveness of Building Energy Performance Standards to Curtail Household Energy Demand: A Theoretical Analysis

Vijay K. Mathur

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No1-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
The Congress of the United States enacted the Energy Conservation and Production Act in 1976. It was amended in 1977. Title III of this act is designed to implement policies to curtail energy demand associated with new buildings; Title IV is aimed at establishing policies to encourage energy conservation in existing buildings. The main purposes of both Titles are to curtail energy consumption on the part of households as well as commercial buildings. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effectiveness of various policies, which may be followed by the government under this Act, for curtailing the energy use by the households. Although no comprehensive energy policy to meet this goal has yet been formulated, the purpose of the Act gives a clear indication about the type of policy that could eventually emerge. My intention is not only to examine the effectiveness of the policy or policies emerging from the above Titles, but also to compare them with alternate, albeit traditional, policies of pricing, taxes, and subsidies aimed to reduce energy demand.



Energy Conservation in the United Kingdom: A Major Industrial Opportunity

Jane Carter

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No1-10
View Abstract

Abstract:
We are standing at a watershed in world development-the transition from an era of cheap and abundant energy to one where energy becomes scarcer and dearer. This paper discusses from the U.K. standpoint the opportunity that enhanced energy conservation presents to industry both to modernize and rethink its energy structures. Also,and of equal importance, is the response to the challenge of meeting the new investment demands that energy conservation presents.



Notes - Sense and Nonsense About World Oil

M. A. Adelman

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No1-13
No Abstract



Notes - A Comparison of the Costs and the Results in the On/Offshore Search for Oil and Gas

Jon A. Rasmussen and Michael J. Piette

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No1-11
No Abstract



Notes - Public Willingness to Invest in Household Weatherization

Marvin E. Olsen and Christopher Cluett

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No1-12
No Abstract







Capital-Energy Substitutionin the Long Run

Joel Gibbons

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No2-7
View Abstract

Abstract:
Econometric modeling of production relationships, especially those of manufacturing industries, entered a period of intense activity with the dramatic energy price shocks of the past ten years. This work has called attention to possibilities for substitution between energy and other factors, but it has not yet led to consensus on all the important issues.' One open issue has to do with the relative substitutability of fixed capital for energy, compared with the substitutability of other factors for energy. One set of studies, generally those based on international cross-section data, finds capital and energy to be Hicksian substitutes. Other studies, based on time series data, find them to be Hicksian complements.



Are Federal Energy Tax Credits Effective? A Western United States Survey

Edwin H. Carpenter and S. Theodore Chester, Jr.

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No2-10
View Abstract

Abstract:
The residential energy credit provided by the federal Energy Tax Act (1977) cannot be carried beyond December 31, 1987, and the Reagan administration has indicated a disinclination to support an extension of its provisions, in either its current or an altered form. Its likely demise indicates nothing about the Act's effectiveness in getting homeowners to invest in energy conservation or solar devices. Rather, it is a reflection of the Reagan philosophy of letting market conditions determine energy conservation decisions. Since the administration is not explicitly passing judgment on the success or failure of residential tax credits, important questions regarding their efficacy remain to be answered. This paper will attempt to shed light on this question. It will examine data derived from a random sample of Western United States homeowners to determine awareness and use of the federal energy tax credit; the role of climate and dwelling type; and the influence of selected socioeconomic factors on the use of energy tax credits. Most important, it will seek to determine the extent to which conservation decisions were contingent on the availability of the tax credits, i, e., what proportion of investments were made wholly or predominantly because of their special tax inducements and what proportion would have been made in any case.




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