Facebook LinkedIn Instagram Twitter
Shop
Search
Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

Search Results for All:
(Showing results 1 to 10 of 35)

Next 10 >>


Household Welfare Loss Due to Electricity Supply Disruptions

Arun P. Sanghvi

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-NoSI-3
No Abstract



The Economics of Electricity Demand Charges

J. Stephen Henderson

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-NoSI-8
No Abstract



Comment on International Energy Agency's World Energy Outlook

David M. Kline and John P. Weyant

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-8
No Abstract



Acknowledgments

n/a

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-9
No Abstract



Volume 4 Index

n/a

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-10
No Abstract





Notes - The Real Price of Imported Oil Revisited

Michael J. Coda and John E. Jankowski, Jr.

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-7
No Abstract



A Note on Measuring Household Welfare Effects of Time-of-Use (TOU) Pricing

Chi-Keung Woo

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No3-12
View Abstract

Abstract:
Several recent studies address the issue of household welfare effects caused by the implementation of time-of-use (TOU) pricing of electricity (for example, see Aigner and Lillard, 1982; Aigner and Learner, 1982; Parks, 1983; and Caves et al., 1983). In these studies, the historical average price is used to assess the household welfare change. Implicit in their approach is the assumption that the original electricity rate structure is a flat one. In fact, however, the common rate structure is multitier, frequently an inverted block. While the literature on demand for electricity includes extensive discussions of whether the average price or the marginal price is the correct price signal to a residential customer (e.g., Taylor, 1975; Nordin, 1976; Terza and Welch, 1982; and Billings, 1982), little attention has been given to evaluating welfare change resulting from TOU pricing.



Efficiency Versus Equity in Petroleum Taxation

Dale W. Jorgenson and Daniel T. Slesnick

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-NoSI-14
No Abstract



A Welfare Approach to Energy Pricing: A Case Study for India

Gopal K. Kadekodi

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
Because oil crises or other supply constraints distort energy production and demand management, energy pricing remains an important policy instrument of economic management. Moreover, for many developing countries, the problem of energy management includes the pricing of energy products within a framework of planning, as well as questions of supply. In many countries energy production and distribution are now publicly managed. Such public operations have to account for both efficiency in production and equity in distribution. The pricing of energy inputs thus emerges as a key planning parameter.



Price Discrimination Limits in Relation to the Death Spiral

J. Stephen Henderson

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No3-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
It is well known that a public utility commission may be able to improve overall social welfare by allowing decreasing-cost industries (such as local public utilities) to price discriminate. For this course of action to be practical, the following conditions must prevail: (1) marginal-cost prices do not cover costs and (2) external subsidies are not feasible. Consequently, the need to raise prices above marginal costs means that some social welfare, measured as the sum of consumer's and producer's surplus, for example, must be sacrificed to allow the utility to break even. To minimize this sacrifice, the proportional deviation of price from marginal cost for each service should be correspondingly larger for markets with inelastic demands than for those in which demand is elastic.' This type of inverse elasticity rule seldom is used in practice and is cited here only to illustrate that pure value-of-service pricing may improve overall social welfare.



The Incidence of Welfare Losses Due to Appliance Efficiency Standards

Mark F. Morss

Year: 1989
Volume: Volume 10
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol10-No1-9
View Abstract

Abstract:
The effect of appliance efficiency standards upon household energy consumption has recently occupied the attention of energy economists: Khazzoom (1987), Bold (1987), Lovins (1988), and Henly et al. (1988). This paper is concerned with the equally important question of the effects of such standards upon household welfare. It is shown that the households most likely to prefer less efficient appliances, and therefore to suffer welfare losses when standards are imposed, are those with low levels of appliance usage- This in conjunction with the results of empirical studies of appliance electricity demand makes it possible to characterize the affected households. An important result developed here is that the direction of given effects upon the demand for appliance efficiency may be deduced from the direction of the corresponding effects upon appliance electricity consumption.



The Welfare Impact of Rising Block Pricing: Electricity in Colombia

Rodney Maddock and Elkin Castano

Year: 1991
Volume: Volume 12
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol12-No4-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
In Medellin, Colombia, electricity prices follow an unusual system of rising block prices. The stated objective of the policy is to redistribute income. In this paper we calculate the degree of redistribution achieved relative to that of a horizontal price schedule. We also calculate the efficiency cost of discrimination. The data come from a survey of over 1000 residential users of electricity.



Growth and Welfare Losses from Carbon Emissions Restrictions: A General Equilibrium Analysis for Egypt

Charles Blitzer, Richard Eckaus, Supriya Lahiri, and Alexander Meeraus

Year: 1993
Volume: Volume 14
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol14-No1-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper assesses the economic effects of carbon emission restrictions in Egypt.Like other studies, it is an exemplification of some of the economic possibilitiesunder various conditions. However, it extends the domain of possibilities andsuggests some issues that have not been considered in other studies.It is demonstrated clearly that, while annual emissions constraints have only a modest effect on long-run economic growth rates, they have substantial effect on the achieved levels of GDP and welfare. These results do not change much, even with backstop and unconventional technologies or change in discounting. However, postponing the imposition of constraints does have a significant effect, as does changing the form of the constraints to one based on accumulated emissions.




Next 10 >>

Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

 





function toggleAbstract(id) { alert(id); }