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Coal Transportation System Modeling: The Case of Taiwan

Gwo-Hshiung Tzeng

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No1-12
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Abstract:
The world energy situation has been greatly influenced by the dramatic increase in world oil prices during the 1970s. To adjust to these increases, many countries have shifted to coal as a substitute for oil and have accelerated their research and development of renewable energy sources. Until nonconventional sources become widely available and economical, coal (along with nuclear power) will play a key role in the world's energy supply. Transportation and delivery, rather than production, pose the most difficult problems in meeting the greatly increased demand for coal.



Coal Transportation System Modeling-The Case of Taiwan: A Comment

R. K. Pachauri, Chia-Yon Chen, and Leena Srivastava

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-9
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Abstract:
In his recent Energy Journal article, G. H. Tzeng emphasizes on the transportation aspects of increased coal use in Taiwan. He does not, however, offer much detail on the economic basis for the switch in National Energy Policy from imported oil to coal. While such a switch confirms that the exercise of rational fuel mix choices has found its due place in Taiwan, it seems appropriate to examine the efficiency of such a switch and its implications, especially for import balances. The new Taiwan energy policy Tzeng describes would increase coal consumption from 7.8 million tons (MT) in 1982 to 43.4 MT over the period ending in 2001. Ninety percent of this requirement would be imported. Of this, more than half would go to the electric power industry (23.8 MT by 2001). The total growth in coal consumption projected by Tzeng for this period amounts to 456 percent in 19 years.



Energy Planning in Taiwan: An Alternative Approach Using a Multiobjective Programming and Input-Output Model

George J. Y. Hsu, Ping Sun Leung and Chauncey T. K. Ching

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-No1-5
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Abstract:
Faced with limited energy resources and soaring energy demand arising from rapid economic growth, Taiwan has to import a substantial amount of energy. In 1983, 88 percent of its total energy requirement (35.54 million kiloliters of oil equivalent) was imported. Since this heavy dependence will likely continue to increase for the next decade, energy economic planning in Taiwan is a critical issue. A major concern has been how "to achieve a certain economic growth rate with a minimum consumption of energy" (Kuo, 1983, p. 312).



Modeling Energy Demand and Socioeconomic Development Of Taiwan

Gwo-Hshiung Tzeng

Year: 1989
Volume: Volume 10
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol10-No2-9
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Abstract:
Taiwan lacks a natural energy endowment. Its energy demands have dramatically increased with the growth of the economy and standard of living during the past two decades. Based on the new socioeconomic developmentpolicy for the next two decades, the government of Taiwan has devoted special attention and effort to improving various social and environmental problems affecting the country's overall quality of life. The increasing rate of household energy demand will slow down as the market for electrical appliances reaches a saturation point and as the energy efficiency of appliances is improved. Transportation policies call for energy conservation during the next two decades by raising energy use efficiency. The industrial sector has also implemented energy conservation measures by raising energy efficiency and by diagnosing and improving energy-use.



Gasoline, Diesel and Motorfuel Demand in Taiwan

Christopher Garbacz

Year: 1989
Volume: Volume 10
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol10-No2-10
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Abstract:
The logarithmic flow models generate elasticity estimates for prices that generally exceed estimates of recent studies both for the short run and the long run. This holds true over gasoline, diesel, and total motorfuel models. The linear gasoline results for price elasticity are in the range of previous estimates. In the logarithmic stock flow models, estimates of gasoline price elasticity exceed both short- and long-run estimates of previous studies. The liner stock flow model generates a price elasticity that is no different than zero (statistically) and an income elasticity that appears to be large in the short-ran.



A Structural Decomposition Analysis of Changes in Energy Demand in Taiwan: 1971-1984

Chia-Yon Chen and Adam Rose

Year: 1990
Volume: Volume 11
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol11-No1-11
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Abstract:
Taiwan represents an interesting case study of a nation that has been able to adapt to the energy crisis remarkably well, registering sustained economic growth despite increased oil import expenditures. Certain characteristics of Taiwan's economy set it apart from a number of other developing countries. First, Taiwan's economy is very closely inter-linked with international markets. It is a major exporter of goods, and it has had to rely heavily on imports of energy since its indigenous energy resources are so meager. Second, the nation has had an unusually high rate of growth over the past 30 years. For example, Taiwan's GNP grew at an average rate of 9.1 percent per year during the period 1952-1980, as opposed to growth rates of generally below 5 percent experienced by many other LDCs during that period.



An Empirical Test of An Electric Utility Under An Allowable Rate of Return

George J.Y. Hsu and Tser-Yieth Chen

Year: 1990
Volume: Volume 11
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol11-No3-4
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Abstract:
This paper examines a utility's behaviour under the regulatory constraint of a maximum allowable rate of return. The golden rule of production efficiency, i.e. that the marginal productivities of the input factors are equal, is used as our criterion to examine the utility's economic behaviour. Our case study uses a translogproduction function to investigate the production efficiency of the Taiwan Power Company. Two null hypotheses are tested with the results obtained supporting the existence of the A-f effect. The implications of the results are discussed, a comparison with previous studies is presented, and suggestions for further research are made.



Decomposition of SO2, NO1 and CO2 Emissions from Energy Use of Major Economic Sectors in Taiwan

Sue J. Lin and Tzu C. Chang

Year: 1996
Volume: Volume17
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol17-No1-1
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Abstract:
In this paper we use the Divisia index approach to decompose emission changes of SO2, NOx and CO2 from major economic sectors in Taiwan during 1980 to 1992. The study highlights the interrelationships between energy use and environmental quality, and provides insights for policy making. The emission changes are decomposed into five components-pollution coefficient, fuel mix, energy intensity, economic growth and industrial structure. Of all components analyzed, economic growth had the largest positive effect on emission changes for Taiwan's major economic sectors. Emissions of SO2 in industry and other sectors showed a decreasing trend due to fuel quality improvements and pollution control. However, NOx and CO2 emissions increased sharply in all sectors. Comparisons were also made with Germany, Japan and USA. This study hay shown that improvement in energy efficiency, pollution control and fuel substitution are major options to reduce SO2, NOx and CO2 emissions.





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