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Antidumping and Feed-In Tariffs as Good Buddies? Modeling the EU-China Solar Panel Dispute

Patrice Bougette and Christophe Charlier

Year: 2018
Volume: Volume 39
Number: Number 6
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.39.6.pbou
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Abstract:
The paper analyzes the interactions between trade and renewable energy policies based on the EU-China solar panel dispute which is the most significant antidumping (AD) complaint in Europe. We build a price competition duopoly model with differentiated products and intra-industry trade in photovoltaic (PV) equipment. We show that an optimal antidumping duty always increases with the feed-in tariff (FIT) program set in the home country. An appropriate antidumping duty - nullifying the dumping margin - decreases with the FIT program. We show that optimal FIT increases with the AD duty. Therefore, trade and renewable energy optimal policies may complement one another. Lastly, we introduce R&D activities in the PV sector, and international spillovers. We show that R&D makes the optimal FIT lower and increases the dumping margin. These effects are reinforced by technological spillovers.



Time-of-Use Electricity Pricing and Residential Low-carbon Energy Technology Adoption

Jing Liang, Pengfei Liu, Yueming Qiu, Yi David Wang, and Bo Xing

Year: 2020
Volume: Volume 41
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.41.2.jlia
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Abstract:
This paper provides the first empirical evidence on the correlation between Time-Of-Use (TOU) electricity pricing and the adoption of energy efficient appliances and solar panels. We use household-level data in Phoenix, Arizona from an appliance saturation survey of about 16,000 customers conducted by a major electric utility. Our empirical results show that TOU consumers are associated with 27% higher likelihood to install solar panels but not more likely to adopt energy-efficient air conditioning based on the propensity score matching and coarsened exact matching methods. The findings highlight that policy makers could combine TOU and solar panels when implementing educational programs or when giving out financial incentives to consumers. Our results imply that TOU is associated with a similar impact of the incentive offered by $2,070~$10,472 tax credits or rebates on solar adoption.





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