Search

Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

Search Results for All:
(Showing results 1 to 5 of 5)



Customer Responsiveness to Real-Time Pricing of Electricity

Jay Zarnikau

Year: 1990
Volume: Volume 11
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol11-No4-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
The success of real-time pricing efforts will depend in large part upon the extent to which electricity consumers are able to alter their consumption patterns in response to the prices quoted by the utility. This article provides some original estimates of hourly price elasticity responses to real-time prices by large industrial energy consumers.



The Long-Run Efficiency of Real-Time Electricity Pricing

Severin Borenstein

Year: 2005
Volume: Volume 26
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol26-No3-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
Retail real-time pricing (RTP) of electricity � retail pricing that changes hourly to reflect the changing supply/demand balance � is very appealing to economists because it �sends the right price signals.� Economic efficiency gains from RTP, however, are often confused with the short-term wealth transfers from producers to consumers that RTP can create. Abstracting from transfers, I focus on the long-run efficiency gains from adopting RTP in a competitive electricity market. Using simple simulations with realistic parameters, I demonstrate that the magnitude of efficiency gains from RTP is likely to be significant even if demand shows very little elasticity. I also show that �time-of-use� pricing, a simple peak and off-peak pricing system, is likely to capture a very small share of the efficiency gains that RTP offers.



Renewable Energy Support, Negative Prices, and Real-time Pricing

Michael Pahle, Wolf-Peter Schill, Christian Gambardella, and Oliver Tietjen

Year: 2016
Volume: Volume 37
Number: Sustainable Infrastructure Development and Cross-Border Coordination
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5547/01956574.37.SI3.mpah
View Abstract

Abstract:
We analyze the welfare effects of two different renewable support schemes designed to achieve a given target for the share of fluctuating renewable electricity generation: a feed-in premium (FiP), which can induce negative wholesale prices, and a capacity premium (CP), which does not. For doing so we use a stylized economic model that differentiates between real-time and flat-rate pricing and is loosely calibrated on German market data. Counter-intuitively, we find that distortions through induced negative prices do not reduce the net consumer surplus of the FiP relative to the CP. Rather, the FiP performs better under all assumptions considered. The reason is that increased use of renewables under the FiP, particularly in periods of negative prices, leads to a reduction of required renewable capacity and respective costs. This effect dominates larger deadweight losses of consumer surplus generated by the FiP compared to the CP. Furthermore, surplus gains experienced by consumers who switch from flat-rate to real-time pricing are markedly higher under the FiP, which might be interpreted as greater incentives to enable such switching. While our findings are primarily of theoretical nature and the full range of implications of negative prices needs to be carefully considered, we hope that our analysis makes policy-makers more considerate of their potential benefits.



Optimization of Time-Varying Electricity Rates

Jacob Mays and Diego Klabjan

Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 5
DOI: https://doi.org/10.5547/01956574.38.5.jmay
View Abstract

Abstract:
Current consensus holds that 1) passing through wholesale electricity clearing prices to end-use consumers will produce maximal efficiency gains and 2) simpler forms of time-varying retail rates will capture only a small portion of potential benefits. We show that neither holds in the presence of capacity costs typical in U.S. wholesale markets. Using an optimization model describing the short-term problem faced by an electricity retailer, we find hourly prices that optimally pass through capacity costs. We estimate benefits for a retailer using these prices as well as optimal configurations of a number of time-varying rate structures. Testing a range of realistic assumptions, we find that in the absence of a well-designed demand charge, passing through clearing prices may miss up to three quarters of the benefits possible from optimal hourly prices. By contrast, a simpler critical peak pricing structure enables retailers to achieve approximately two-thirds of the total possible benefits.



High Taxes on Cloudy Days: Dynamic State-Induced Price Components in Power Markets

Leonard Göke and Reinhard Madlener

Year: 2022
Volume: Volume 43
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.43.1.lgok
View Abstract

Abstract:
State-induced components constitute the major share of electricity prices for consumers and are generally charged at a fixed rate. We analyze the benefits of charging state-induced price components at time-varying rates instead, especially with regard to the integration of variable renewable energy (VRE) sources and to decarbonization. For this purpose, we apply a detailed power market model that puts particular emphasis on electricity demand and how it is sensitive to prices. For a quantitative case study, the model is parametrized to represent a German energy system with an 85% share of renewables in its power generation. We find that dynamization has a reducing effect on integration costs of VRE, ranging from 0.3 to 3.4 €/MWh. Furthermore, strong distributional effects in favor of flexible consumers can be observed.





Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

 

© 2022 International Association for Energy Economics | Privacy Policy | Return Policy