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Nigeria's Internal Petroleum Problems: Perspectives and Choices

Akin Iwayemi

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No4-4
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Abstract:
As a major oil producer and member of OPEC, Nigeria benefited greatly from the sharp increases in world oil prices during the 1970s. It was especially hard hit by the weakening of oil markets during the past four years, when its oil production had to be cut back sharply and its prices reduced. The impact of these developments, including the replacement of the civilian government by a military regime in December 1983, has been discussed elsewhere. I Less well known abroad is the fact that during this entire period, Nigeria suffered sporadic but severe internal energy supply problems, including shortages of petroleum products and irregular availability of electricity. If past policies are continued, Nigeria's energy problems are likely to become severe enough to jeopardize its position as an oil exporter.



Oil Production Policy and Economic Development in Mexico

Hossein Razavi

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No2-5
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Abstract:
The economics literature of the oil market is primarily concerned with the behavior of OPEC member countries, viewing the non-OPEC oil exporters as insignificant. Recently, however, oil exports by non-OPEC countries have expanded substantially, increasing the role these countries play in the oil market. Among these countries, Mexico is of special interest because it is the largest non-OPEC oil exporter, with huge petroleum resources; at the same time, it has an enormous requirement for foreign exchange.



Lifting the Alaskan Oil Export Ban: An Intervention Analysis

Charles W. Bausell Jr., Frank W. Rusco and W. David Walls

Year: 2001
Volume: Volume22
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol22-No4-4
No Abstract



What Oil Export Levels Should We Expect From OPEC?

Dermot Gately

Year: 2007
Volume: Volume 28
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol28-No2-7
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Abstract:
We analyze the levels of oil exports that should be expected from OPEC over the next 25 years. We search for a long-term, market-adaptive, robustly optimal strategy that best serves OPEC's interests, and conclude that OPEC export profits will be higher if OPEC expands its oil exports by enough to maintain OPEC exports share of non-OPEC demand. Yet the incentives for this export expansion are relatively small only a few percent in terms of discounted export profits and it requires that OPEC be farsighted, because the higher export profits from faster export growth wonot be significant within the next decade. Moreover, if OPEC does maintain its exports share of non-OPEC demand, the continued rapid growth of OPEC's own oil consumption will require that OPEC oil output will have to increase 60% by 2030, which will be a major challenge.



The Impact of the Fracking Boom on Arab Oil Producers

Lutz Kilian

Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 6
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.38.6.lkil
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Abstract:
This article makes four contributions. First, it investigates the extent to which the U.S. fracking boom has caused Arab oil exports to decline since late 2008. Second, the article quantifies for the first time by how much the U.S. fracking boom has lowered the global price of oil. Using a novel econometric methodology, it is shown that in mid-2014, for example, the Brent price of crude oil was lower by $10 than it would have been in the absence of the fracking boom. Third, the article provides evidence that the decline in Saudi net foreign assets between mid2014 and August 2015 would have been reduced by 27% in the absence of the fracking boom. Finally, the article discusses the policy choices faced by Saudi Arabia and other Arab oil producers.





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