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Nigeria's Internal Petroleum Problems: Perspectives and Choices

Akin Iwayemi

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No4-4
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Abstract:
As a major oil producer and member of OPEC, Nigeria benefited greatly from the sharp increases in world oil prices during the 1970s. It was especially hard hit by the weakening of oil markets during the past four years, when its oil production had to be cut back sharply and its prices reduced. The impact of these developments, including the replacement of the civilian government by a military regime in December 1983, has been discussed elsewhere. I Less well known abroad is the fact that during this entire period, Nigeria suffered sporadic but severe internal energy supply problems, including shortages of petroleum products and irregular availability of electricity. If past policies are continued, Nigeria's energy problems are likely to become severe enough to jeopardize its position as an oil exporter.



Oil Demand Elasticities in Nigeria

Felix B. Dayo and Anthony O. Adeghulugbe

Year: 1987
Volume: Volume 8
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol8-No2-3
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Abstract:
Crude oil, which was first discovered in Nigeria in 1956 by the Shell-BP Development Company, has contributed significantly to the country's economic development. The exploitation of this resource transformed Nigeria's balance of trade from chronic deficits to huge surpluses (especially during the early-to-mid 1970s). This occurred as a result of the increase in the volume as well as the value of crude oil during this period. However, the surplus started to decline in the mid-1970s due to a combination of increased imports (resulting from the oil-boom mentality that had developed) and reduced crude oil exports (caused by the downward trend in world economic situations). By late 1977 the country again had a deficit on visible trade.



Optimal Structure of the Nigerian Energy Supply Mix

Anthony O. Adegbulugbe, Felix Davo, Thomas Gurtler

Year: 1989
Volume: Volume 10
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol10-No2-11
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Abstract:
Nigeria, a member of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), is blessed with relatively abundant energy resources like petroleum, gas, coal, solar, hydropower, etc. With an estimated population of 80 million, the country also has abundant human resources. In spite of her varied human and energy resources, the performance of the Nigerian economy has been closely linked with one resource, petroleum, a situation characteristic of most OPEC member countries.



Alternate Energy Strategies for the Developing World's Domestic Use: A Case Study of Nigerian Households' Fuel Use Patterns and Preferences

Edward L Onyebuchi

Year: 1989
Volume: Volume 10
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol10-No3-8
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Abstract:
Through case studies in rural and urban settings within Nigeria, this paper examines the degree to which qualities associated with commonly proposed new energy supply technologies for developing countries satisfy the needs and preferences of Nigerian households. The paper demonstrates that the often cited, and unquestionably important advantages of such technologies, including ecological safety, renewability, decentralization of supply systems, and diversity are not factors which carry sufficient appeal to individual households in determining fuel choices for domestic purposes. The study finds that safety, reliability of supply, convenience, and a fuel's versatility are the factors which determine its desirability.



Self-Generation and Households' Willingness to Pay for Reliable Electricity Service in Nigeria

Musiliu O. Oseni

Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.38.4.mose
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Abstract:
Many households in developing countries often engage in self-generation to mitigate the impacts of poor public electricity provision. What is less well known, however, is whether (and how) self-generation influences households' willingness to pay (WTP) for service reliability. Using data collected from a sample of Nigerian households, the results reveal that engagement in self-generation is positively correlated with WTP for reliability. This is despite the fact that self-generation reduces the negative welfare impact of unreliability. Further analyses, however, show that backup households' decisions to pay a higher amount than non-backup households are influenced by the costs of self-generation: an increase of N1 (US$0.006) in self-generation's fuel cost per-hour is associated with WTP about N5.22 (US$0.032) more in the monthly bill. However, households' WTP US$0.15-0.16/kWh of improved reliability is smaller than the marginal costs of reliability from self-generation - US$0.27-0.41/kWh. We conclude by discussing the policy implications of our findings.





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