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The U.S. Outlook for Supplemental Gas

Arlon R. Tussing

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No1-7
View Abstract

Abstract:
Current forecasts of natural gas demand in the United States through the turn of the century are lower than projections made only a few years ago, and fall far short of the volumes the economy is technically capable of absorbing even with its existing stock of energy-using equipment.



The Benefits of an Alaskan Natural Gas Pipeline

Douglas B. Fried and William F. Hederman, Jr.

Year: 1981
Volume: Volume 2
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol2-No1-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
The United States, reacting to rising prices and supply uncertainties of imported energy, has begun to move aggressively to develop its untapped domestic energy resources. The Department of Energy has recently awarded funds to support feasibility studies as well as design, engineering, and construction activities for 110 synthetic fuel projects. Despite pressures for budgetary restraint, Congress has steadily increased (in real terms) budgets for research and development for a variety of technologies utilizing solar and geothermal energy. The federal government has leased potentially oil-rich offshore tracts in the Northeast despite strong opposition from the fishing industry and environmental groups. Yet, despite this apparent scramble to exploit domestic energy resources, a variety of factors has delayed construction of the pipeline that would transport natural gas from deposits on Alaska's North Slope to gas markets in the lower 48 states.



Natural Gas Curtailment Policy: Where Do We Go from Here?

George R. HallVice

Year: 1981
Volume: Volume 2
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol2-No4-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
Natural gas production in the United States peaked in 1973 at 22.6 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) per year and has averaged about 19 Tcf each year since then. A more basic measure of natural gas supply is reserve additions, the amount of natural gas added to the nation's producible inventory. Reserve additions dropped precipitously in 1967, from 21 Tcf to 13.7 Tcf per year. Since then, they have fluctuated around 9 Tcf per year.



Supplemental Sources of Natural Gas: An Economic Comparison

Alvin Kaufman, Susan J. Bodilly

Year: 1981
Volume: Volume 2
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol2-No4-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
Over the past decade, the United States has become increasingly dependent on imported energy, and there has been an attendant impact on the balance of payments. For example, 43 percent of the oil used in the United States was imported in the first six months of 1979, compared with 35 percent in 1973. Of these 1979 imports, 67 percent was supplied by the OPEC countries, including 40 percent from Arab producers. During the six months preceding the 1973-74 embargo, Arab producers supplied only 15 percent of U.S. imported oil. At the same time, OPEC oil has increased in price, through the machinations of the cartel. The massive income transfer is indicated by the rise in the U.S. oil balance of payments bill, from $3.4 billion inthe first six months of 1973 to $24.4 billion during the first six months of 1979.



The Short-Run Residential Demand for Natural Gas

Roberta Barnes, Robert Gillingham, Robert Hagemann

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No1-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
Effective and efficient energy conservation policy requires accurate and comprehensive estimates of residential energy demand pa-rameters. These parameter estimates are among the most important inputs into informed policy decisions. In turn, accurate estimation of energy demand parameters requires realistic modeling of the consumer's demand behavior, detailed information on energy consumption, and careful treatment of any econometric problems created by the model and data base.



The Potential Role of Natural Gas in a Major Oil Crisis

Benjamin Schlesinger, Nelson E. Hay, and Jacquelyn S. Mitchell

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No2-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
Most energy experts in the federal government involved with contingency planning concern themselves with what to do when or if "the balloon goes up"; i.e., after the nation's 6-million-barrel-per-day oil supply is substantially cut off.



I. Conceptual Framework - The Gordian Knot of Natural Gas Prices

Henry D. Jacoby and Arthur W. Wright

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No4-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
Federal policy toward natural gas prices is once again the subject of national debate. Thought to be settled once and for all by the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 (NGPA), it reemerged as an issue in 1981. The proximate causes of the renewed controversy included candidate Ronald Reagan's campaign promise to seek wellhead price decontrol, and the Reagan administration's attempts (until March 1982) to find a workable decontrol proposal. But the wellsprings of the problem go deeper than this, to the history of gas price regulation, to changes in energy markets since 1978, and to serious defects in the NGPA itself.



II. Problems with the NGPA - The Need to Modify the Natural Gas Policy Act

Catherine Good Abbott

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No4-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
The current debate over the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 (NGPA) has three components: 1. Is the NGPA likely to achieve the goals Congress established for it in 1978? 2. Is the NGPA likely to lead to an extension of controls beyond 1985? If so, what are the consequences of such an extension? 3. What are the costs and benefits of alternatives to the NGPA?



IV. The Economics of Gas Supply, The Effects of Decontrol Policy Options

Steven E. Muzzo

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No4-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
Over the past nine or so years, the United States has focused a large portion of its national attention on energy concerns. Indeed, the world economy is in the midst of an economic revolution over the value of one of its most important inputs. A new economic reality-that once cheap energy sources that fuel the world economy are becoming more and more expensive-has forced much of the world, and especially the United States, to reevaluate its policies on energy sources and uses.



V. Policy Trends: The Future Is Now - The Decline and Fall of Regulation in the Natural Gas Industry

Arlon R. Tussing and Connie C. Barlow

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No4-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
A theme that runs through the long, convoluted history of natural gas regulation is the seemingly inexorable expansion of government intervention. Regulation has spawned further regulation; soon after one regulatory gap was filled, another appeared. Municipal franchising and price regulation of gas distributors led to state oversight of intrastate gas transmission, which prompted federal regulation of interstate transmission, followed by control of interstate affiliated field prices and later interstate independent field prices. Finally, the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 (NGPA) extended federal jurisdiction to all intrastate field sales.




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