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Summer Time and Electricity Conservation: The Israeli Case

Haim Shore

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No2-4
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Abstract:
Summer Time (ST) refers to the practice of advancing the clock during the summer (commonly by one hour) in order to adjust it to changes of sunrise and sunset times at that period. Conventionally, ST is expected to accomplish three objectives: To reduce electricity consumption during dark evening hours.To reduce use of air conditioning systems during the morning. This effect,the result of an additional cool hour, is partially offset by an increasedconsumption of electricity for lighting during very early morning hours. To increase productivity (particularly in the industrial sectors that are notair-conditioned) following an additional cool hour in the morning.



Evaluating Energy Options for Israel: A Case Study

Nissan Levin, Asher Tishler, and Jacob Zahavi

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No1-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
More than 98 percent of Israel's primary energy resources are imported, most of it as crude oil, the rest of it as coal, placing the country in a most vulnerable and awkward position. The sharp increases in crude oil prices in 1973 following the Yom Kippur War and in 1979 has increased the country's economic burden, contributing to its increasing deficit in the balance of payments and staggering inflation rate. Perhaps here more than anywhere else, a balanced energy policy is most crucial for security and well-being. Such policy would allow diversification of primary energy resources by using more alternative and renewable resources supplemented by a variety of ways of managing demand and controlling peak-load growth.



A Stochastic Model for the Measurement of Electricity Outage Costs

Abraham Grosfeld-Nir and Asher Tishler

Year: 1993
Volume: Volume 14
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol14-No2-8
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Abstract:
The measurement of customer outage costs has recently become an important subject of research for the electric utilities. This paper uses a stochastic dynamic model as the starting point in developing a market-based method for the evaluation of outage costs. Specifically, the model postulates that once an electricity outage occurs, all production activity stops. Full production is resumed once the electricity outage is over. This process repeats itself indefinitely. The business customer maximizes his expected discounted profits (the expected value of the firm), taking into account his limited ability to respond to repeated random electricity outages. The model is applied to 11 industrial branches in Israel. The estimates exhibit a large variation across branches.



The Cost of Power Outages in the Business and Public Sectors in Israel: Revealed Preference vs. Subjective Valuation

Michael Beenstock, Ephraim Goldin, and Yoel Haitovsky

Year: 1997
Volume: Volume18
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol18-No2-3
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Abstract:
Cross-section data on investment in back-up generators and uninterruptable power supplies (UPS) are used to infer the implied cost of electricity outages in the business and public sectors in Israel. Two-limit tobit models of the demand for back-up are estimated and used to simulate the mitigated and unmitigated cost of power outages. These "revealed preference estimates of outage costs are then compared with estimates based on the method of subjective evaluation.



The Bias in Price Elasticity Estimates Under Separability Between Electricity and Labor in Studies of Time-of-Use Electricity

Asher Tishler

Year: 1998
Volume: Volume19
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol19-No2-13
View Abstract

Abstract:
Most time-of-use(TOU) studies of electricity use in the business sector have found little overall response, as measured by price elasticities, to TOU rates. These studies employed the assumption of weak separability between electricity and all other inputs. Here, we use the generalized Leontief cost function to show that when labor is included in the estimation, the electricity price elasticities are larger, in absolute values, than when labor is erroneously excluded. This result is demonstrated with data on electricity and labor for about 400 Israeli business customers. We also show that the omission of labor from the estimation may cause serious underestimation of the net welfare gains that result from changing a flat electricity price to a TOU rate.





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