Facebook LinkedIn Instagram Twitter
Shop
Search
Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

Search Results for All:
(Showing results 1 to 10 of 80)

Next 10 >>


Financing Solar Repowering and the Quantification of External Benefits

Jules H. Kamin and J. Clair Ellis

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No2-9
View Abstract

Abstract:
Encouragement of investment in domestic energy projects capable of displacing imported petroleum is a central objective of U.S. energy policy. Private industry will be the primary vehicle for developing improvements in efficiency of new technologies, reducing costs to levels competitive with conventional technologies, and building the required industrial infrastructure.



The Demand for Electricity Services and the Quality of Supply

Romesh Dias-Bandaranaike and Mohan Munasinghe

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No2-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
The spiraling costs of energy within the last decade have stimulated renewed interest in the increased efficiency of energy production and consumption.' Electricity is a relatively mature sector where considerable theoretical work on the economic aspects has been carried out since the 1950s.2 While the microeconomic principles underlying optimal investment planning and pricing policy have received much attention in the recent literature, less effort has been devoted to the effects of quality of supplyand output reliability.



Evaluating Alternative Energy Policies: An Example Comparing Transportation Energy Investments

James K. Binkley, Wallace E. Tyner, and Marie E. Matthews

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No2-7
View Abstract

Abstract:
Designing appropriate programs to deal with present and future energy problems faced by the United States has created a need for the evaluation and comparison of different policies. An important component of this is the generation of accurate information concerning the benefits and costs of alternative courses of action. Energy analysis is enormously complex, however, due to the pervasive influence of energy throughout the economy and the manifold factors that must be considered. Schmalensee has written that "discussions of energy policy, especially as regards new technologies, tend rapidly to become unwieldy because of the large number of serious complicating factors whose relevance is arguable" (1980, pp. 2-3). As a result of these complications, any information available to evaluate alternative energy policies Will almost of necessity be incomplete.



The International Energy Investment Dilemma

Paul Tempest

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No3-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
There never has been a global energy market. What there is, at the consumer end, is an amalgam of national energy systems developed from local resources onto which have been grafted various energy imports. Of these, the only truly internationally traded energy commodity is oil. For their base-load energy needs, most national economies have relied on committed systems of domestic supply usually embedded deeply in their own public utility infrastructure and industrial systems. The prices to the consumer of all these forms of energy are heavily masked by subsidy, taxation, and other forms of government control. The availability of domestic energy varies greatly from country to country. There are therefore great variations between countries (and also within countries) in the resource cost of energy and the price to the consumer.



Risk-Bearing and the Choice of Contract Forms for Oil Exploration and Development

Charles R. Blitzer, Donald R. Lessard, and James L. Paddock

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No1-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
The structure of taxes and fiscal contracts between host countries and foreign companies has major implications for the success of oil development projects. This is because of several key characteristics of such projects: large investment outlays, long lead times to project completion, and long periods of project output and payout. These characteristics usually are coupled with an incomplete sharing of information and technology, and significant differences in the ability of the various parties to bear the risks involved. These characteristics often lead to unstable contracts and, in many cases, to the failure to develop projects that are economically attractive in aggregate terms but unattractive to one or both parties because of uncertainties over sharing project risks and returns.



Energy Conservation in the United Kingdom: A Major Industrial Opportunity

Jane Carter

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No1-10
View Abstract

Abstract:
We are standing at a watershed in world development-the transition from an era of cheap and abundant energy to one where energy becomes scarcer and dearer. This paper discusses from the U.K. standpoint the opportunity that enhanced energy conservation presents to industry both to modernize and rethink its energy structures. Also,and of equal importance, is the response to the challenge of meeting the new investment demands that energy conservation presents.



Notes - Sense and Nonsense About World Oil

M. A. Adelman

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No1-13
No Abstract



Notes - A Comparison of the Costs and the Results in the On/Offshore Search for Oil and Gas

Jon A. Rasmussen and Michael J. Piette

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No1-11
No Abstract



Notes - Public Willingness to Invest in Household Weatherization

Marvin E. Olsen and Christopher Cluett

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No1-12
No Abstract







Appropriate Financing for Petroleum Development in Developing Countries

Tamir Agmon, Donald R. Lessard, and James L. Paddock

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No3-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
The availability of appropriate financing is likely to be a dominant factor determining the scope and pace of energy investment by developing countries in the 1980s. Reliance on self-finance will severely limit development for most countries, but traditional external finance-credit from private banks or multilateral agencies such as the World Bank-will probably play a smaller role than it did in the 1970s. External financing is less likely to be readily available now; at the same time, borrowers have become more aware of its limitations. Because of the time lags and uncertainties involved in most energy-related investments, the nature and volume of financing are likely to have a significant impact on the character and rate of investment.1 In fact, for enterprises or governments that are constrained1. While the relevance of finance to energy policy is clear, the research conducted to date has only scratched the surface. In one of the earliest studies of links between energy and finance, Agmon et al. (1979) examined the financial behavior of key OPEC members and considered the likely effect of changes in financial markets on their capacity and production decisions. Ben-Shahar (1976) and Moron (1978) evaluated the "revenue needs" of OPEC countries and related them to oil production scenarios. Dailami (1978, 1979a, 1979b) constructed econometric macrofinancial models of several oil-exporting countries; he then analyzed the impact of oil revenues on the countries' economy and the attendant influence of policy variables.



Rate-of-Return Attrition and Inflation-Induced Penalties in Public Utility Common Stocks

Wallace N. Davidson, III and John L. Glascock

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No4-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
While the rate of inflation seems to be easing, the interest in its impact on corporate security prices (Feldstein, 1980) and on corporate investment policy (Caks, 1981; Higgins, 1977) has continued. Unlike nonregulated firms, utilities face the added difficulties of regulation-induced inflation penalties and return on equity (ROE) attrition.



An Analysis of Fiscal and Financial Impediments to Oil and Gas Exploration in Developing Countries

Charles R. Blitzer, Panos E. Cavoulacos, Donald R. Lessard, and James L. Paddock

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-NoSI-6
No Abstract




Next 10 >>

Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

 





function toggleAbstract(id) { alert(id); }