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(Showing results 1 to 6 of 6)



Estimating Industrial Energy Demand with Firm-Level Data: The Case of Indonesia

Mark M. Pitt

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No2-3
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Abstract:
A number of recent studies have analyzed the role of energy in the structure of production. Most have used either a single time series for a country's manufacturing sector or time series data pooled by country or manufacturing subsector. The absence of similar data sets for developing countries has precluded the same type of analysis of their production structures. This is unfortunate since the impact of higher energy prices on these countries has been at least as severe as on the industrial countries. Furthermore, since it is likely that their structure of production is significantly different, the results of the existing econometric literature may not be applicable in understanding the role of energy prices in their economies.



The Application of the Divisia Index to the Decomposition of Changes in Industrial Energy Consumption

X. Q. Liu, B. W. Ang and H.L. Ong

Year: 1992
Volume: Volume 13
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol13-No4-9
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Abstract:
We review a number of methods that have recently been proposed to decompose changes in industrial energy consumption. We then propose two parametric methods based on the Divisia index, where the integral path problem in the Divisia index is transformed into a parameter estimation problem. It is shown that there can be an infinite number of sets of decomposition results, each corresponding to a particular combination of parameter values, and that several recently proposed methods are in fact special cases of these two methods. We then introduce an approach to estimate the parameter values uniquely. Referred to as the Adaptive Weighting Divisia Method, this method is supported by vigorous mathematical analysis and does not involve arbitrary guesses of parameter valuesas is the case for the existing methods. We also discuss the application and the associated statistical problems of the various decomposition methods, and present the results of a study using the data for Singapore industry.



Estimating Disaggregated Price Elasticities in Industrial Energy Demand

Mahmoud A. T Elkhafif

Year: 1992
Volume: Volume 13
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol13-No4-11
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Abstract:
Econometric energy models are used to evaluate past policy experiences, assess the impact of future policies and forecast energy demand. This paper estimates an industrial energy demand model for the province of Ontario using a linear-logit specification for fuel type equations which are embedded in an aggregate energy demand equation. Short term, long-term, own- and cross-price elasticities are estimated for electricity, natural gas, oil and coal. Own- and cross-price elasticities are disaggregated to show the overall price elasticities and the "energy-constant" price elasticities when aggregate energy use is held unchanged. These disaggregations suggest that a substantial part of energy conservation comes from the higher aggregate price of energy and not from interfuel substitution.



A Micro-Econometric Analysis of the Industrial Demand for Energy in NSW

Alan D. Woodland

Year: 1993
Volume: Volume 14
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol14-No2-4
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Abstract:
This paper analyzes an extensive data set consisting of observations on all manufacturing establishments in New South Wales, Australia over an eight-year period. The focus is on the determinants of the demands by manufacturing establishments for different fuels (namely coal, oil, gas and electricity) and, in particular, upon the responsiveness of the demands to changes in the prices of the various fuels, the wage rate, and the rental rate on capital. Particular attention is paid to the facts that (a) establishments have different patterns of fuel consumption and (b) gas and electricity have block-pricing structures. Estimates of own-price elasticities of demand for electricity, gas and oil are higher than appear in the literature.



A Dynamic Model of Industrial Energy Demand in Kenya

Semboja Haji Hatibu Haji

Year: 1994
Volume: Volume15
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol15-No4-10
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Abstract:
This paper analyses the effects of input price movements, technology changes, capacity utilization and dynamic mechanisms on energy demand structures in the Kenyan industry. This is done with the help of a variant of the second generation dynamic factor demand (econometric) model. This interrelated disequilibrium dynamic input demand econometric model is based on a long-term cost function representing production function possibilities and takes into account the asymmetry between variable inputs (electricity, other-fuels and labour) and quasi-fixed input (capital) by imposing restrictions on the adjustment process. Variations in capacity utilization and slow substitution process invoked by the relative input price movement justifies the nature of input demand disequilibrium. The model is estimated on two ISIC digit Kenyan industry time series data (1961 - 1988) using the Iterative Zellner generalized least square method.



Decomposition of Aggregate Energy and Gas Emission Intensities for Industry: A Refined Divisia Index Method

B. W. Ang and Ki-Hong Choi

Year: 1997
Volume: Volume18
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol18-No3-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
Several methods for decomposing energy consumption or energy-induced gas emissions in industry have been proposed by various analysts. Two commonly encountered problems in the application of these methods are the existence of a residual after decomposition and the handling of the value zero In the data set. To overcome these two problems, we modify the often used Divisia index decomposition method by replacing the arithmetic mean weight function by a logarithmic one. This refined Divisia index method can be shown to give perfect decomposition with no residual. It also gives converging decomposition results when the zero values in the data set are replaced by a sufficiently small number. The properties of the method are highlighted using the data of the Korean industry.





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