Facebook LinkedIn Instagram Twitter
Shop
Search
Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

Search Results for All:
(Showing results 1 to 4 of 4)



The Real Price of Imported Oil

Joy Dunkerley and John E. Jankowski, Jr.

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No3-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
The continual upward adjustment since 1973 in international quoted oil prices has been accompanied by two countervailing developments. The first is the weakening of the dollar against many national currencies. Since transactions in the international oil market are conducted in dollars, many countries were able to offer less of their national currency for each dollar of oil purchased. Second, sharply rising prices of all other goods and services in many oil-importing coun-tries diminished the impact of the relative rise in oil prices. Thus oil appeared as only one of a host of rising prices, perhaps rising more strongly than other prices but otherwise indistinguishable from a multitude of inflationary pressures. In other words, the real price of oil to importing countries may not have been rising as strongly in real terms as is suggested by price quotations from internationally traded crude oil. If this is the case, pressures for limiting oil imports and oil conservation generally would be weakened.



The Role of Renewables in Hawaii's Energy Future

Jayant Sathaye and Henry Ruderman

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No2-9
View Abstract

Abstract:
Hawaii is extremely vulnerable to disruptions in the world oil market. Over 90 percent of the state's energy comes from imported petroleum, most of which comes from foreign sources. Petroleum also has an indirect impact because of the large role tourism plays in the Hawaiian economy.



Comment on International Energy Agency's World Energy Outlook

David M. Kline and John P. Weyant

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-8
No Abstract



Acknowledgments

n/a

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-9
No Abstract



Volume 4 Index

n/a

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-10
No Abstract





Notes - The Real Price of Imported Oil Revisited

Michael J. Coda and John E. Jankowski, Jr.

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-7
No Abstract



The Social Cost of Imported Oil

Elena Folkerts-Landau

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No3-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
Structural adjustments in the economy and an increase in uncertainty about future oil prices followed the two oil price shocks of the 1970s and suggested that continued dependence on imported oil was costly. It was argued that private decisions to consume imported oil did not appropriately take into account the country's vulnerability to oil exporters. Accordingly, a literature developed around the idea that the market price of imported oil does not reflect the full social cost.





Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

 





function toggleAbstract(id) { alert(id); }