Facebook LinkedIn Instagram Twitter
Shop
Search
Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

Search Results for All:
(Showing results 1 to 3 of 3)



Energy in Transition: A View from 1960

Hans H. Landsberg

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No2-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
Twenty-one years ago, Resources for the Future (RFF), then about ten years old, released a heavy tome of a little over a thousand pages, half text and half statistical appendix, called Resources in America's Future. Together with my two coauthors, Leonard L. Fischman and Joseph L. Fisher, RFF's president at the time, I had put considerable effort into the project. So had fifteen staff members and consultants and eight research assistants. To the best of my knowledge, none of them ever revisited the scene after 1963, and if they did, they didn't tell the world. We hold no reunions, observe no anniversaries. Still I have never quite freed myself of a degree of curiosity, best phrased as "how did we come out?" My own copy of the book bears the scars of that curiosity. It is full of penciled-in figures, put there in different years, without much orderliness. Once in a while, a current event would cause me to do some quick figuring, some comparison shopping. But it has all been quite unsystematic.



Hans H. Landsberg and Sam H. Schurr: Reflections and Appreciation

Joel Darmstadter

Year: 2003
Volume: Volume24
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol24-No4-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
With some notable exceptions see the accompanying biographies the career paths of Hans Landsberg and Sam Schurr diverged in some significant ways, as I ll note momentarily. (Never mind the personality angle: Hans, the raconteur, with an extraverted side; Sam, more low key and reserved.) Even so, we deem it fitting to commemorate their careers and professional contributions jointly in this dedicated issue of the Journal. There is, of course, the fact that Hans and Sam s life spans both lived well into their eighties were almost entirely overlapping, their deaths just a few months apart. There is also the fact that both found themselves (though by utterly different odysseys) out of work in New York City in the latter part of the 1930s: the Great Depression wasn't always that much kinder to America's unemployed than to its immigrant community. (Hans had not long before experienced a harrowing exposure to and escape from Nazism.) In any case, both managed independently to attract the attention of senior researchers at the National Bureau of Economic Research, then housed at Columbia University and headed by Arthur Burns. This contact led to gainful employment, lasting until close to the outbreak of World War II when again through sheer coincidence each was recruited for wartime duty by the OSS.



Energy Policies and Their Consequences After 25 Years

Paul L. Joskow

Year: 2003
Volume: Volume24
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol24-No4-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
Hans Landsberg and Sam Schurr each led research teams that produced two important energy futures policy studies that were published in 1979. The conclusions, policy recommendations, and energy demand, supply, and price forecasts contained in these studies are reviewed. Developments in U.S. energy policy over the last 25 years are discussed and compared with the recommendations contained in the two studies. The projections of energy demand, supply, and prices for 2000 contained in the studies are presented and compared to actual realizations. The nature, magnitudes, and reasons for the differences between the studies forecasts and what actually emerged 25 years later are discussed. All things considered, the Landsberg and Schurr studies have stood the test of time very well.





Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

 





function toggleAbstract(id) { alert(id); }