Facebook LinkedIn Instagram Twitter
Shop
Search
Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

Search Results for All:
(Showing results 1 to 6 of 6)



The Real Rural Energy Crisis: Women's Time

Irene Tinker

Year: 1987
Volume: Volume 8
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol8-NoSI-7
No Abstract



Energy Economics in Developing Countries: Analytical Framework and Problems of Application

Mohan Munasinghe

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-No1-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
The pervasive and vital role of energy in national economies indicates that the identification of energy issues and energy policy analysis and implementation are important areas of study. While the drop in world oil prices which began in 1986 has provided some relief to the economies of oil-importing nations, energy-related problems still preoccupy the minds of decision-makers in most developing countries. Thus, while most of the key energy issues identified during the past decade persist, the availability of adequate energy resources at reasonable cost remains a vital precondition for continued economic growth. Typically, energy investments still account for about 25 percent of total public capital investments in developing countries.



A Welfare Measure of a New Type of Energy Assistance Program

Kenneth W. Costello

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-No3-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
The sharp increase in utility rates since the 1970s has inflicted great hardship on low-income households. For many, paying their utility bills means sacrificing the purchase of other commodities essential to their economic well-being.' Another symptom of this problem is exhibited by the increased number of low-income people whose utility service has been cut off. Energy assistance programs have been instituted to cope with this serious problem. The major objectives of these programs are: (a) to make energy more affordable to the poor, thereby reducing the number of service disconnections, and (b) to limit how much the poor must pay for energy so that more funds are available for purchasing other essential commodities.



The Welfare Impact of Rising Block Pricing: Electricity in Colombia

Rodney Maddock and Elkin Castano

Year: 1991
Volume: Volume 12
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol12-No4-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
In Medellin, Colombia, electricity prices follow an unusual system of rising block prices. The stated objective of the policy is to redistribute income. In this paper we calculate the degree of redistribution achieved relative to that of a horizontal price schedule. We also calculate the efficiency cost of discrimination. The data come from a survey of over 1000 residential users of electricity.



Appliance Standards and the Welfare of Poor Families

Steven Stoft

Year: 1993
Volume: Volume14
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol14-No4-8
View Abstract

Abstract:
Sutherland recently described U.S. federal appliance standards as causing a welfare loss that falls "particularly heavily on poor families." He attributed this loss to their risk aversion and to their being forced to invest at a discount rate of 7%. This note estimates the loss caused by this risk aversion at less than eight cents per year in the case of the 1993 refrigerator standard, and documents that standards have not been designed with the intention of forcing consumers to invest at a 7% discount rate.



Energy Economics: A Place for Energy Poverty in the Agenda?

Fatih Birol

Year: 2007
Volume: Volume 28
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol28-No3-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
The global energy system faces three major strategic challenges in the coming decades: the growing risk of disruptions to energy supply; the threat of environmental damage caused by energy production and use; and persistent energy poverty. The first two challenges have attracted a lot of attention from the energy-economics community, much less so the need to address the problem of energy under-development. On current trends, the number of people in poor countries relying primarily on traditional biomass for their energy needs will continue to rise, while the number lacking access to electricity will barely fall. To change this course, decisive policy action is needed urgently as part of the broader process of human development. Meeting basic human needs, such as food and shelter, must be at the heart of any strategy to alleviate poverty. Modern energy services help enable those needs to be met. In practice, concrete improvements in human welfare can be realised quickly at modest short-term cost. Strong political will and commitment on the part of the governments of the world's poorest countries will be crucial. Rich industrialised countries have an important role to play in this process too. In addition to moral issues involved, we have obvious long-term economic, political and energy-security interests in helping developing countries along the path to energy development. The cost of providing assistance to poor countries may turn out to be far less than that of dealing with the instability and insecurity that poverty creates.





Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

 





function toggleAbstract(id) { alert(id); }