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(Showing results 1 to 9 of 9)



Integrated National Energy Planning: A Case Study of the Republic of Korea

Byong-hun Ahn, Hvung-wook Kim, Dale M. Neshitt, and Robert L. Phillips

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No2-2
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Abstract:
Like other oil-importing countries, the Republic of Korea was surprised by the rapid oil price escalation of the 1970s. Following the lead of the United States, Europe, and Japan, Korea's energy policy in the mid-1970s was based on reducing oil imports by substituting other fuels, installing more efficient oil conversion processes, or doing without. Due in part to the urgency of the situation and in part to a lack of accumulated analytical capability, it was difficult to analyze in depth which alternatives were best, how much they would cost, or to what extent it was in Korea's best interests to bear large economic costs to reduce oil imports. Rather, Korean policymakers implemented a broad-based oil consumption reduction program to mitigate their immediate oil import problem.



Energy R & D Decionmaking in Developing Countries

Mohan Munasinghe

Year: 1987
Volume: Volume 8
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol8-NoSI-8
No Abstract







Energy Planning in Taiwan: An Alternative Approach Using a Multiobjective Programming and Input-Output Model

George J. Y. Hsu, Ping Sun Leung and Chauncey T. K. Ching

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-No1-5
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Abstract:
Faced with limited energy resources and soaring energy demand arising from rapid economic growth, Taiwan has to import a substantial amount of energy. In 1983, 88 percent of its total energy requirement (35.54 million kiloliters of oil equivalent) was imported. Since this heavy dependence will likely continue to increase for the next decade, energy economic planning in Taiwan is a critical issue. A major concern has been how "to achieve a certain economic growth rate with a minimum consumption of energy" (Kuo, 1983, p. 312).



Renewable Energy and Long-Term Energy Planning

Helene Connor-Lajambe

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-No3-7
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Abstract:
Even without any energy crisis, exploiting renewable sources of energy appears more and more important to ensure the reliability of long-term supply and to provide relief now. According to the Canadian Office of Energy Research and Development, in 1985 renewable energy sources (excluding large hydro developments) contributed to yearly needs as much energy as frontier oil and gas fields combined are expected to yield by the turn of the century. This contribution was not forecast in official studies, and this failure demands that we look into the causes.



Integrated Energy Planning in India: A Modeling Approach

R. K. Pachauri and Leena Srivastava

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-No4-3
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Abstract:
The economic planning process in India can broadly be broken up into two steps: the building up of Five Year Plans and the specification of Annual Plans. Several planning models were used to arrive at a balanced allocation of resources for attaining the objectives and targets of growth and social welfare postulated in each Five Year Plan.



Pollution Control and Energy Conservation: Complements or Antagonists? A Study of Gasoline Taxes and Automobile Fuel Economy

Molly Espey

Year: 1997
Volume: Volume18
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol18-No2-2
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Abstract:
Energy conservation regulations, such as fuel taxes and fuel economy mandates for automobiles, are often assumed to reduce air pollution in lock step with the reduction in fuel consumption. Under the current system of tailpipe emissions regulations in the United States, this is not necessarily true. This paper uses a simple graphical analysis to illustrate the relative impact of fuel taxes and fuel economy standards on pollution levels given the current tailpipe emissions standards and an alternative emissions standard. Under current tailpipe emissions standards, increases in fuel economy would actually raise emissions, and significantly larger fuel taxes would be required to achieve the same level ftollution reduction as under the proposed alternative standard. These results confirm earlier findings that used mathematical and stochastic simulation methods to address this issue.



Markets vs. Regulation: A Role for Indicative Energy Planning

Ignacio J. Perez-Arriaga and Pedro Linares

Year: 2008
Volume: Volume 29
Number: Special Issue #2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol29-NoSI2-8
View Abstract

Abstract:
The energy sector worldwide is facing the enormous challenge of finding a path of economic, environmental, and social sustainability. This paper argues that, although markets are adequate instruments to achieve an efficient allocation of resources and to promote private initiative, the resolution of the sustainability challenge cannot be left only to market forces, but requires other complementary instruments, among which we highlight indicative energy planning. We discuss the role of indicative energy planning in the future of liberalized energy markets, and propose a general methodology for its implementation, as well as the identification of the major issues to be addressed.





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