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(Showing results 1 to 6 of 6)



Energy Policy: An Economist's Confessions

James R. Schlesinger

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No1-3
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Abstract:
It is a particular pleasure to be addressing an association of professional colleagues. I must concede it is the first time that I have done so since I was on the faculty at the University of Virginia. The atmosphere here is a little bit chilly; you can rest assured that when our rulemaking on temperature control takes effect on July 1, you will not have this experience.



Change and Continuity

P. H. Frankel

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No4-1
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Abstract:
This award, which elevates me to the ranks of its previous distin-guished recipients, gives me great pleasure, especially since I am the first non-American to receive it. This in itself is an indication of the ever-widening scope of the Association. It comes to me at the end of a long life devoted to our industry. It is almost sixty years since I entered it as a junior business executive ... It is now forty years since I wrote my first book, appropriately titled Essentials of Petroleum, and almost thirty years since I left business to make my hobby my job when I formed Petroleum Economics Ltd., an international consulting firm.



Energy and Economy: Global Interdependences

William W. Hogan

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No4-2
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Abstract:
This meeting, the Seventh International Conference of the International Association of Energy Economists (IAEE), finds us again in the midst of transitions in energy markets. Continued adjustments in oil demand, natural gas bubbles in Europe and North America, closures of refineries, and concerns about acid rain are just a few of the issues that reflect the turbulence and continued change in energy concerns and policy. This list of challenges suggests opportunities for energy economists to contribute their special perspectives to the clarification of issues and options. At an international conference, we can reinforce communications across national boundaries as we consider our related problems.



Oil and Rival Energy Sources

P. C. Despraries

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No4-3
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Abstract:
Mr. President, Very Honorable Minister Jochimsen, Ladies and Gentlemen:Several weeks ago, when my friend Jane Carter so greatly honored me by inviting me to make this talk, she mentioned my "unique" experience with international oil and energy markets. This word unique seems to me to be a good semantic example of overstatement such as is fairly rarely found in English except when required by specific circumstances. We are all unique in this room. The president-elect of your association invited me to take off for the summits and to describe from up there the wonderful countryside of our Earth, irrigated by the economy and lit up by energy, the two sources of mankind's wealth and the subject of this conference. But when I began to spread my wings, I found that the countryside beneath me was extraordinarily familiar and that it was hard to find much of anything to describe that you had not already depicted yourselves hundreds of times.



Energy Economists in the 21st Century

Pierre Desprairies

Year: 1989
Volume: Volume 10
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol10-No1-3
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Abstract:
Ladies and gentlemen, when I asked what the customary procedure was for this ceremony, I was told that the person receiving the award habitually gave a little talk on the subject of his choice. Since futurology is familiar to me, I have chosen to speak of energy economists in the twenty-first century.



Energy Economists and Economic Liberalism

Colin Robinson

Year: 2000
Volume: Volume21
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol21-No2-1
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Abstract:
Energy markets in many countries have been extensively liberalised in recent years as part of the revival of market economics. However, though ,everyone may believe in markets now', there are differences of opinion about what constitutes a competitive market. The perfect competition paradigm persists and leads to demands for state regulation to counteract 'imperfections' anti failures'. Energy economists should look more sceptically than they generally do at these calls for regulation, most of which have little to do with the 'public interest': in the long run the accretion of regulation may lead back to extensive state control.





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