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Coal Policy and Energy Economics

Richard L. Gordon

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No1-8
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Abstract:
With the flurry of legislation in 1977 further inhibiting coal consumption and production, it became apparent to many observers that coal had joined oil, gas, and nuclear energy as a tightly regulated industry. Since by now this observation has been widely dissemi-nated, it seems most appropriate here only to summarize the nature of the barriers and their obvious implications. Then emphasis can be placed on the perspectives that economic analyses can provide for evaluating the issues.



Biomass Energy Economics

John R. Benemann

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No1-11
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Abstract:
The energy crisis has become a permanent fixture in our lives. It is apparent that the brief era, roughly 1920-1970, of rela-tively low and declining fuel costs is over for good. The world economic system must adjust to a new era of high-cost fuels, supply dislocations, and transition to new energy sources. Large uncertainties exist about the future availability, production costs, and market prices of the conventional fuels-oil, gas, and coal. Even greater uncertainties exist about the costs of the alternative energy sources-nuclear power and renewable resources, principally solar. As more information becomes available, nuclear power is constantly required to increase its safety level, becoming ever more expensive. The high-risk, very large, very long-term capital



Still a Time to Choose ...Ten Years Later

S. David Freeman

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No2-2
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Abstract:
I think it is appropriate that we should end this conference on energy economics with a look at the record of the past nine years, the years since the energy world was turned upside down by the 1973 Arab oil embargo.This nation's foremost energy accomplishment of this period has not been in achieving increased production. Despite a tenfold increase in the price of crude oil, U.S. production in 1981 was about the same as in 1973. Natural gas production was down. Production of coal and uranium has gone up some, but overall, neither consumption nor domestic production of energy has increased in the last nine years.



Perspectives on nonparametric and Semiparametric Modeling

Adonis Yatchew

Year: 2008
Volume: Volume 29
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol29-NoSI-2
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Abstract:
Nonparametric regression techniques hold out the promise of more flexible modeling of data in many areas of physical, biological and social sciences. However, their use is hampered by the "curse of dimensionality" which imposes enormous data requirements as the number of explanatory variables increases. After summarizing two of the most commonly used methods for mitigating the �curse�, this paper outlines a new approach which exploits data on derivatives. In economics, such circumstances arise in the joint estimation of cost and factor demand functions, or when production function data are combined with data on factor prices. The ideas are illustrated using empirical examples from energy economics.



Introduction

Ying fan and Adonis Yatchew

Year: 2016
Volume: Volume 37
Number: China Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.37.SI1.yfan
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