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Residential Electricity Revisited

Hendrik S. Houthakker

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No1-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
The following is a report on various attempts to update and improve an earlier analysis of residential electricity demand (Houthakker, Verleger, and Sheehan, 1974-hereafter referred to as HVS). To understand what is new the reader should first know what has been maintained, namely:1. the logarithmic flow-adjustment model which estimates this year's consumption from last year's consumption, this year's price and income, and possibly (though not in HVS) from other variables,2. the pooling of annual time series for 48 states using the error component approach of Balestra & Nerlove, 3. the use of a "marginal price" for electricity.The present paper may be regarded as a verification of the first of these hypotheses, and to some extent of the other two.



Residential Substitution of Off-peak for Peak Electricity Usage under Time-of-Use Pricing

Douglas W. Caves and Laurits R. Christensen

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No2-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
This article reports on the methodology, procedures, and conclusions from the first phase of our econometric analysis of the Wisconsin Time-of-Use (TOU) Electricity Pricing Experiment.' Dur-ing Phase I, which took place during the summers of 1976 and 1977, we confined our attention to assessing consumer ability and/or willingness to shift electricity usage from peak to off-peak (P/OP)



Risks and Psychic Costs of Alternative Energy Sources for Generating Electricity

Miller B. Spangler

Year: 1981
Volume: Volume 2
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol2-No1-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
According to public opinion polls, many people in the United States do not agree that there is truly an energy crisis. President Carter referred to it as an "invisible" crisis in the National Energy Plan of 1977.



Air Quality Implications of a Nuclear Moratorium: An Alternative Analysis

Anthony Bopp, Verne Loose

Year: 1981
Volume: Volume 2
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol2-No3-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
The role of nuclear power in the nation's energy future is and probably will continue to be one of the principal energy policy issues in the United States. Relatively inexpensive coal reserves and escalating costs of light water reactors have eroded a once-large cost advantage enjoyed by nuclear technologies. While the relative cost advantage of nuclear over coal electric power has become a subject of debate, other less concrete issues have surfaced and often overshadow economic arguments. Antinuclear "forces" generally view the technology as the essence of what they consider wrong with modern technological society. Pronuclear "forces" counter that much fear associated with nuclear power derives from the newness of the technology and that the air quality and possible economic gains associated with nuclear power make it the preferable choice for future electricity generation.



The Dilemma of Economic Versus Statistical Models of Energy

J. Daniel Khazzoom

Year: 1981
Volume: Volume 2
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol2-No3-10
View Abstract

Abstract:
The recent surge of interest among energy planners in economic models' for predicting the energy outlook has coincided with a growing senseof disillusionment among many practicing econometricians about the forecasting performance of economic models (see, for example, Stekler, 1968).Many economists argue that the problem with economic models lies in the economic theories behind them. These theories analyze the impact of policy changes on the assumption that the structure will not change, when in fact what may happen is that the structure itself, and not just the variables ofinterest, may change as policy changes. What is needed is a theory that predicts how the structure will change in response to such policy changes.



Nuclear Power for Developing Countries: Attainable Within This Century?

Eli B. Roth

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No2-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
To use or not to use nuclear power for generating electricity has, in many parts of the world, become as much an emotional issue as an economic or technical one. Probably this is even more so in developed than in developing countries. The menacing worldwide energy misallocations and shortages have been the subject of a number of conferences, workshops, articles, studies, and - in the United States at least - of pronouncements by advocates ranging in style and substance from Jane Fonda to Barry Commoner to Edward Teller. It is not necessary to take sides here on the narrower question of whether any country in particular should try to use nuclear power for electricity or should try to avoid it. But except perhaps for antinuclear diehards, surely anyone concerned with the plight of developing countries, whose other energy resources are often wholly inadequate, must be interested in finding a satisfactory way to open up for those countries, or to keep open, the nuclear option.



Response of Industrial and Commercial Customers to Time-of-Use Rates

James J. Brzycki and Arlyn C. Frederick

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No2-10
View Abstract

Abstract:
In their article "Industrial and Commercial Demand for Electricity by Time of Day: A California Case Study," Chinbang Chung and Dennis J. Aigner present an econometric model of industrial demand for electricity by time of day and attempt to estimate relevant price elasticities.



Electricity Demand in Primary Aluminum Smelting

Knut Anton Mork

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No3-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
Primary aluminum smelting is one of the giant energy users among the manufacturing industries. With current technology, the smelting is done by an electrolytic process requiring as much as 13 to 19 megawatt-hours (MWh) of direct-current electricity per metric ton of aluminum metal.



A Technology Choice for Model Electricity Generation

Ralph L. Keeney

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-NoSI-2
No Abstract



Household Welfare Loss Due to Electricity Supply Disruptions

Arun P. Sanghvi

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-NoSI-3
No Abstract




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