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The Role of Banks in EU Emissions Trading

Johanna Cludius and Regina Betz

Year: 2020
Volume: Volume 41
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.41.2.jclu
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Abstract:
This paper is an empirical investigation of the role of banks in the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS). This topic is of particular interest considering that banks are responsible for a large and increasing share of overall transactions under the EU ETS and that they provide regulated companies with services related to emissions trading. Using both semi-structured interviews as well as descriptive and regression analysis, we investigated the different roles banks play in EU emissions trading and whether their importance as trading partners differs in relation to different types of regulated companies. Our regressions based on data from the first trading period of the EU ETS show that large companies with trading experience are more likely to choose a trading strategy involving interaction with a range of financial intermediaries, in particular banks or exchanges, than smaller, less professionalized companies, which tend to follow a trading strategy involving brokers (in particular for selling allowances). These findings can help policymakers decide on the level of involvement of non-regulated companies in their systems, which is currently allowed to varying degrees under different ETS. We recommend that this decision should be closely linked to provisions of market oversight and the level of control over the different types of financial players active in emissions trading.



On the CO2 Emissions Determinants During the EU ETS Phases I and II: A Plant-level Analysis Merging the EUTL and Platts Power Data

Benoît Chèze, Julien Chevallier, Nicolas Berghmans, and Emilie Alberola

Year: 2020
Volume: Volume 41
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.41.4.bche
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Abstract:
This article studies ex-post the CO2 emissions determinants during 2005�2012 by resorting to an original database merging the European Union Transaction Log (EUTL) with the World Electric Power Plants (WEPP) database maintained by Platts. We estimate the main drivers of CO2 emissions for the 1,453 power plants included in the EU ETS using plant-level panel data. During phases I and II, there has been a debate about whether the economic crisis was ultimately the only factor behind the fall in CO2 emissions. We find that the EU ETS kept some degree of effectiveness but only during phase I (2005�07). During phase II (2008�12), its impact has been largely impeded by the deep economic recession in 2008�2009 which became the leading cause of the emissions reduction. We disentangle the analysis not only by periods but also for each type of power plants. We conclude that the EU Commission�s flagship climate policy could and should be enhanced by better coordination of overlapping climate policies.





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