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European Reliance on Soviet Gas Exports: The Yamburg-Urengoi Natural Gas Project

Boyce L Greer and Jeremy L. Russell

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No3-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
Editor's Note: The proposal to construct a giant pipeline to transmit natural gas from the Soviet Union to Western Europe has received wide attention on both sides of the Atlantic. Its implications extend into all aspects of East-West relations, including security and economic effects on both the Soviet Union and the gas-importing countries. This article focuses on one main area of concern raised by the pipeline, dependence by Western Europe on Soviet gas. Given the controversial nature of the subject, we are especially interested in comments from our readers.



The Impact of the Oil Price Decline on the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe

Jan Vanous

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No3-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
The effects on the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe of the decline in the world market price of oil (and the subsequent likely decline in international prices of natural gas and coal) can be divided into three groups: direct, or first-round effects-the impact of the decline in net hard-currency export revenue/net import outlays for oil and other types of energy;"spillover" effects-the impact of potential Soviet cutback in the quantity of energy sold to Eastern Europe for nonconvertible rubles and at preferential prices; indirect, or secondary effects-the impact of oil price cuts on world market interest rates and thus the cost of debt servicing; the impact on Western economic recovery and thus the demand for imports from the Eastern bloc, and so on.



Notes - European Reliance of Soviet Gas Exports

Ferdinand E. Banks

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No3-6
No Abstract



Nuclear Energy After Chernobyl: Views from Four Countries

Ulf Hansen, Christine Chapuis, Thomas J. Connolly and Arto Lepisto

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-No1-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
At the end of 1986, 397 nuclear power plants with a total of 274 GW were in operation worldwide. Their electricity generation was equivalent to burning 500 million tons of coal or 7 million barrels per day of oil, roughly 40 percent of the OPEC output. When the 134GW under construction are finished, uranium-based electricity will substitute some 850 million tons of coal equivalent (mtce) per year. Nuclear power is now the largest primary energy source for electricity generation in the twelve countries of the European Community.



A New Modeling Framework For Medium-Term Energy-Economy Analysis in Europe

Pantelis Capros Pavlos Karadeloglou, Gregory Mentzas and Pierre Palette

Year: 1989
Volume: Volume 10
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol10-No4-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper presents the main theoretical and empirical issues concerning the HERMES-MIDAS Linked Systems (HMLS) of models. The systems are very large scale and are intended to perform European-wide medium-term investigations of the energy-economy interactions. The macroeconomic model follows the neo-Keynesian approach to economic modeling while the set of energy demand and supply models follows a mired engineering-econometric one. We facilitate the presentation of the linkage by proposing a typical aggregate neo-Keynesian model into which we introduce energy and proceed by establishing a general framework for energy-economy model linkages. This framework is applied to the coupling ofthe actual large-scale models. Finally, thepolicy analysis capabilities of the HMLS in contrast to the original HERMES model are examined by means of a theoretical and empirical comparison of the two systems' simulation properties and policy responses.



Cost-Effective Control Strategies for Energy-Related Transboundary Air Pollution in Western Europe

Heinz Welsch

Year: 1990
Volume: Volume 11
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol11-No2-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
In this paper a simulation model of the West European power plant industry, combined with transboundary source-receptor relationships, is used to determine cost-effective reduction rates for SO2 emissions in any one country so that certain, exogenously given, deposition reduction targets are attained. The overall costs implied by the proposed strategies, and their distribution among countries, are examined and compared to those associated with the traditional emission-standard approach. It is found that the cooperative and flexible strategies considered allow for overall cost savings of up to 60 percent, given the same degree of deposition reduction.



Analyzing Oil Production in Developing Countries: A Case Study of Egypt

Nazli Choucri, Christopher Heye and Michael Lynch

Year: 1990
Volume: Volume 11
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol11-No3-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
This article presents a detailed simulation analysis of the domestic oil sector in Egypt; a near-typical, non-OPEC, oil-producing developing country. Egypt is a small producer by international standards, yet significant enough that its oil production is important for the country's economy and under certain conditions, for the international oil market as well. A dynamic computer simulation model that depicts significant characteristics of the country's oil sector is utilized to explore the implications of alternative scenarios for government policies, world oil prices, and geological parameters on patterns of production, exports, and export earnings.



The Greenhouse Effect: A View From Europe

David Pearce and Edward Barbier

Year: 1991
Volume: Volume 12
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol12-No1-9
View Abstract

Abstract:
Various countries in Europe are considering tax schemes to combat the threat of global warming and Europeans have shown their concern by their growing support of the various Green parties. Unfortunately, policy-oriented research on climate warming lags behind North America and governments still seem to display a "wait and see" philosophy. Europe expects a leading role in any global climate convention and, because of its trade links and the uniqueness of the British Commonwealth, has a special role in regard to developing countries. These links are especially important since domestic policies must be coordinated and combined with international agreements in order to be effective.



Impacts of the Gulf War and Changes in Eastern Europe

Jean H. Masseron

Year: 1992
Volume: Volume 13
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol13-No3-1
No Abstract



Prospects for Natural Gas in Western Europe

Peter R. Odell

Year: 1992
Volume: Volume 13
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol13-No3-3
No Abstract




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