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Chapter 9 - Greenfield Decommissioning at Shippingport: Cost Management and Experience

William Murphie

Year: 1991
Volume: Volume 12
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol12-NoSI-9
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Abstract:
Although there are many indications that nuclear power plants are likely to stay on site for a period of 60 to 100 years after closure, there are also several reasons to remove the facility from the landscape, such as the desire to use the site for a new power plant or other purpose, safety, and aesthetics. Such removal is underway in several countries including Japan, the United Kingdom, and Germany. In this chapter, William Murphie gives us a unique look at the internal cost management and engineering planning experience acquired during the first U.S. commercialsize plant removal, recently completed at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station near Pittsburgh. The project was especially valuable as it provided a detailed comparison between estimated and actual costs. Some of the more important findings were that (1) detailed advance planning is cost effective, (2) labor costs can result in significant increases in total costs, (3) waste disposal costs can bring about substantial discrepancies between planned and realized costs, and (4) actual costs were within 10 percent of the estimated costs. Although there are several differences between the Shippingport reactor and other power plants, this project afforded the nuclear community an early opportunity to gain insights into many of the contingencies that may occur with full dismantlement.



Chapter 11 - Generic Approaches to Estimating U.S. Decommissioning Costs

Richard I. Smith

Year: 1991
Volume: Volume 12
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol12-NoSI-11
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Abstract:
The estimation of decommissioning costs has certain common features, regardless of country or state. In the U.S., the NRC has taken this into account as they worked on the development of generic estimates. The author of this chapter, Richard Smith, has been at the center of this effort for more than a decade. In this chapter, he summarizes three principal methods that have been used in cost estimates in lite U.S.: the linear extrapolation approach, the unit cost factor approach, and the detailed engineering approach which he helped to develop at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Washington state.



Chapter 24 - The Optimal Time to Decommission Commercial Nuclear Reactors

Geoffrey S. Rothwell

Year: 1991
Volume: Volume 12
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol12-NoSI-24
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Abstract:
One of the key questions related to decommissioning is its optimal timing. In this final chapter, Geoffrey Rothwell integrates the findings presented in Nuclear Decommissioning Economics by proposing a model of discounted decommissioning costs. The real cost of decontaminating a reactor is specified as a function of its size, the volume of radioactive material, radiation exposure regulation, and the rate of productivity change in the decommissioning industry. The model allows calculation of an optimal waiting period between reactor shutdown and decommissioning. The optimal waiting period decreases with tighter radiation exposure regulation and higher inflation rates for radioactivewaste burial.





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