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Economic Inefficiency of Passive Transmission Rights in Congested Electricity Systems with Competitive Generation

Shmuel S. Oren

Year: 1997
Volume: Volume18
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol18-No1-3
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Abstract:
The main thesis of this paper is that passive transmission rights such as Transmission Congestion Contracts (TCCs) that are compensated ex-post based on nodal prices resulting from optimal dispatch by an Independent System Operator (ISO) will be preempted by the strategic bidding of the generators. Thus, even when generation is competitive, rational expectations of congestion will induce implicit collusion enabling generators to raise their bids above marginal costs and capture the congestion rents, leaving the TCCs uncompensated. These conclusions are based on a Cournot model of competition across congested transmission links where an ISO dispatches generators optimally based on bid prices. We characterize the Cournot equilibrium in congested electricity networks with two and three nodes. We show that absent active transmission rights trading, the resulting equilibrium may be at an inefficient dispatch and congestion rents will be captured by the generators. We also demonstrate how active trading of transmission rights in parallel with 42 competitive energy market can prevent the price distortion and inefficient dispatch associated with passive transmission rights.



A New Game Theoretical Approach for Modeling Export Energy Markets Equilibria

Ibrahim Abada and Andreas Ehrenmann

Year: 2018
Volume: Volume 39
Number: Number 5
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.39.5.iaba
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Abstract:
For resource-based economies, regulating exports is crucial. Nevertheless, we observe different countries deploying different export policies. We explain this difference via strategic interactions by giving two competing countries the possibility to design their export markets and select the level of competition they exert. In a first step, we test standard models and find that they fail to explain the multitude of observed behaviors: under the closed loop Nash equilibrium paradigm, the equilibrium is reached when countries completely open their export market. The Stackelberg game on the other hand concentrates the market in a plausible way but is not symmetric since it appoints a leader and follower. In a second step, we let countries choose between being strategic or passive in their interaction and demonstrate that the competitive outcome that we find in the closed loop Nash game rarely occurs. Only this last setup complies with the commonly observed situations.Keywords: Game theory, Cournot models, Open/closed loop models, Stackelberg models, Divisionalization





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