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Risks and Psychic Costs of Alternative Energy Sources for Generating Electricity

Miller B. Spangler

Year: 1981
Volume: Volume 2
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol2-No1-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
According to public opinion polls, many people in the United States do not agree that there is truly an energy crisis. President Carter referred to it as an "invisible" crisis in the National Energy Plan of 1977.



Household Welfare Loss Due to Electricity Supply Disruptions

Arun P. Sanghvi

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-NoSI-3
No Abstract



The Cost Of Residential Electric Power Outages

Robert W. Gilmer and Richard S. Mack

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-NoSI-4
No Abstract



Comment on International Energy Agency's World Energy Outlook

David M. Kline and John P. Weyant

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-8
No Abstract



Acknowledgments

n/a

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-9
No Abstract



Volume 4 Index

n/a

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-10
No Abstract





Notes - The Real Price of Imported Oil Revisited

Michael J. Coda and John E. Jankowski, Jr.

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No4-7
No Abstract



The Social Cost of Imported Oil

Elena Folkerts-Landau

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No3-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
Structural adjustments in the economy and an increase in uncertainty about future oil prices followed the two oil price shocks of the 1970s and suggested that continued dependence on imported oil was costly. It was argued that private decisions to consume imported oil did not appropriately take into account the country's vulnerability to oil exporters. Accordingly, a literature developed around the idea that the market price of imported oil does not reflect the full social cost.



The Double Inefficiency of the Windfall Profits Tax on Crude Oil

Jerry Blankenship and David L. Weimer

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-NoSI-15
No Abstract



A Decision Analysis Approach to Energy System Expansion Planning

James P. Peerenboom and Wesley K. Foell

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
Capacity expansion decisions are critically important to both public and private-sector energy suppliers as well as regional and national energy planning agencies. Simplistically stated, planning for the expansion of an energy supply system involves determining when and where new energy production facilities of various types and sizes should be deployed to meet projected demands. As with most energy-related decision problems, several factors complicate capacity expansion planning. These factors include the involvement of multiple decisionmakers and interest groups, uncertainties about technology costs and demand projections, varying degrees of risk associated with alternative energy technologies, the need to consider costs and effects over long time horizons, and the difficulty of quantifying key impacts and concerns.



Long-Term Versus Short-Term Costs of Electricity Supply Interruptions: A Cautionary Note

Peter Lewin and Steve G. Parsons

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No2-13
View Abstract

Abstract:
Increasing attention has been given in recent years to the valuation of reliability in the supply of electricity. It is peculiar in the use of the terms that the value of reliability is equivalent to the cost of unreliability. In attempting to identify and measure this cost, researchers have drawn a distinction between different types of cost, particularly short- and long-term costs. In this paper, we examine this distinction to clarify what may be a source of confusion.



Residential Gas Cooling: A Life-cycle Approach

Richard L. Itteilag and Christina A. Swanson

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No4-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
The outlook for increased gas cooling use has not only improved because the residential air conditioning market in general has grown but also because many of the factors that depressed gas air conditioner sales earlier have been eliminated. First, the gas cooling equipment available today is more reliable and durable than before. During the 1960s, deficiencies in the gas absorption air conditioner caused an annual failure rate of about 8 percent. It is now less than 1 percent due to a number of improvements implemented by Arkla Industries during the 1970s. For example, the stainless steel generators in the units were improved with chrome plating, which prolongs the system life of the units. The quality of the steel in the restrictors, burner tubes, and evaporator coils was also improved. Residential gas air conditioners now carry a ten-year warranty on all defects in material and workmanship on the sealed refrigeration unit, while a compressor in an electric air conditioner normally has only a one- to five-year warranty.



Long-run Adjustment to Alternative Levels of Reliability in Electricity Supply

Robert W. Gilmer and Richard S. Mack

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No4-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
Most studies of reliable electricity supplies have been artful efforts to quantify the benefits of additional electric generating capacity (Webb; Andersson and Taylor). Outages are treated as the result of insufficient capacity, and outage costs are weighed against whatever outlays are necessary to bring new generation into the electrical system. Given the emphasis on long-run supply in the ultimate usefulness of these studies, research has focused to a remarkable degree on the cost of individual outage events (Sanghvi, 1982). The customer's long-run response to a change in reliability levels has rarely received much attention, and when it has been considered it has been treated as an analytically difficult or intractable problem. Our purpose is to show that the economics of long-run adjustments to a different level of reliability are in fact quite simple and easily incorporated into standard cost/benefit studies.




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