Search

Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

Search Results for All:
(Showing results 1 to 2 of 2)



The Impact of Sulfur Limits on Fuel Demand and Electricity Prices in Britain

David M. Newbery

Year: 1994
Volume: Volume15
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol15-No3-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
By the year 1996, about one-quarter of Britain's electricity will be generated from gas, compared to zero in 1992, displacing coal. This switch is required by 2000 to meet the EC and UN mandated sulfur emissions limits, but was advanced by the imperfect market created by privatisation. This paper examines the economics of Flue Gas Desulfurisation, and argues that without the right to trade emissions permits, FGD may run at only 17% load because of premature investment in gas generation. Tradable permits have a large impact on profits for the generators and British Coal. At present the pool fails to schedule plant on avoidable cost, and electricity prices are likely to be set by the price of gas, not the emissions limits, though gas prices may rise with tighter future limits.



What's in the Cards for Distributed Resources?

Johannes P. Pfeifenberger, Philip Q Hanser and Paul R. Ammann

Year: 1997
Volume: Volume 18
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol18-NoSI-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
The electric utility industry is in the midst of enormous changes in its market structure. Mile the generation sector moves towards a truly competitive market, the utilities' transmission and distribution functions are undergoing a transition to unbundled services and prices. These changes will affect the competitionbetween distributed and central-station generation technology. Although the ultimate market potential for distributed generation may be significant, the market will be fragmented and heterogeneous. Distributed generation will likely succeed in some small and only a few medium-sized market segments, each narrowly defined by the segment's unique operating requirements. The largestpotential market segment is for distributed generation technology with operational and economical characteristics suitable for peak shaving. Unbundling of utility costs and prices will make base-load and intermediate load equipment, such as fuel cells, significantly less attractive in the largest market segments unless capital costs fall substantially below $1,000 per kilowatt.





Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

 

© 2020 International Association for Energy Economics | Privacy Policy | Return Policy