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Biomass Energy Economics

John R. Benemann

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No1-11
View Abstract

Abstract:
The energy crisis has become a permanent fixture in our lives. It is apparent that the brief era, roughly 1920-1970, of rela-tively low and declining fuel costs is over for good. The world economic system must adjust to a new era of high-cost fuels, supply dislocations, and transition to new energy sources. Large uncertainties exist about the future availability, production costs, and market prices of the conventional fuels-oil, gas, and coal. Even greater uncertainties exist about the costs of the alternative energy sources-nuclear power and renewable resources, principally solar. As more information becomes available, nuclear power is constantly required to increase its safety level, becoming ever more expensive. The high-risk, very large, very long-term capital



Competing Energy Uses for Wood Wastes in British Columbia

Michael Margolick, Ardo H. Hansson, and John F. Helliwell

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No1-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
One of the many significant impacts of silicon-chip technology is the ability to do detailed engineering-based microeconomic simulations of industrial behavior under variations in input and output prices, tax schemes, and technological choice. If the number of plants in an industry is manageable and each plant can be parameterized by a manageable number of coefficients, each plant's response to such variations can be computed individually. Consistent aggregation produces industry-wide results, together with impacts on output and factor demands. Furthermore, cost-benefit analysis of possible new plants or technologies is made far more flexible, as the implications of possible future price or tax environments can be easily computed.



Natural Gas from Seaweed: Is Near-Term R&D Funding by the U.S. Gas Industry Warranted?

Chennat Gopalakrishnan

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No4-10
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper is the result of a study of critical factors the Gas Research Institute (GRI) needed to consider in deciding whether to continue R&D funding of a Marine Biomass Project (M BP). The mission of this project is to determine the commercial feasibility of large marine biomass farms for methane conversion and to develop such farms if they prove viable (Aquaculture Associates, 1982).



Energy, Economics, and Foregin Policy in the Soviet Union

Arthur W. Wright

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No4-11
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper is the result of a study of critical factors the Gas Research Institute (GRI) needed to consider in deciding whether to continue R&D funding of a Marine Biomass Project (M BP). The mission of this project is to determine the commercial feasibility of large marine biomass farms for methane conversion and to develop such farms if they prove viable (Aquaculture Associates, 1982).



Modeling and Measuring Natural Resource Substitution

William A. Donnelly

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No4-12
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper is the result of a study of critical factors the Gas Research Institute (GRI) needed to consider in deciding whether to continue R&D funding of a Marine Biomass Project (M BP). The mission of this project is to determine the commercial feasibility of large marine biomass farms for methane conversion and to develop such farms if they prove viable (Aquaculture Associates, 1982).



Energy, Foresight, and Strategy

Mark Newton Lowry

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No4-13
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper is the result of a study of critical factors the Gas Research Institute (GRI) needed to consider in deciding whether to continue R&D funding of a Marine Biomass Project (M BP). The mission of this project is to determine the commercial feasibility of large marine biomass farms for methane conversion and to develop such farms if they prove viable (Aquaculture Associates, 1982).



Fuelwood in Urban Markets: A Case Study of Hyderabad

Ruthann C. Moomy

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No4-14
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper is the result of a study of critical factors the Gas Research Institute (GRI) needed to consider in deciding whether to continue R&D funding of a Marine Biomass Project (M BP). The mission of this project is to determine the commercial feasibility of large marine biomass farms for methane conversion and to develop such farms if they prove viable (Aquaculture Associates, 1982).



Bioenergy and Economic Development

Ruthann C. Moomy

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No4-15
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper is the result of a study of critical factors the Gas Research Institute (GRI) needed to consider in deciding whether to continue R&D funding of a Marine Biomass Project (M BP). The mission of this project is to determine the commercial feasibility of large marine biomass farms for methane conversion and to develop such farms if they prove viable (Aquaculture Associates, 1982).



Acknowledgments

n/a

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No4-16
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper is the result of a study of critical factors the Gas Research Institute (GRI) needed to consider in deciding whether to continue R&D funding of a Marine Biomass Project (M BP). The mission of this project is to determine the commercial feasibility of large marine biomass farms for methane conversion and to develop such farms if they prove viable (Aquaculture Associates, 1982).



Impact of Biomass Availability on Selection of Optimal Energy Systems and Cost of Energy

P. R. Shukla and T. K. Moulik

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No2-8
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper assesses the impact of biomass availability on the selection of optimal energy systems, allocation of energy to various energy needs, and cost of energy to villages. Proposals are considered for the development of biomass resources and subsidization of biomass-based energy systems. The analysis applies the Mixed Integer Linear Programming (MILP) optimization model to four villages under existing conditions, as well as under various proposals affecting biomass availability and costs of energy systems using biomass. It is based on a comprehensive study (Moulik and Shukla, 1985) that contains many details beyond the scope of this paper.



Energy Demand Analysis in Developing Countries: A Review

Ramesh Bhatia

Year: 1987
Volume: Volume 8
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol8-NoSI-2
No Abstract



Assessing the Interactions among U.S. Climate Policy, Biomass Energy, and Agricultural Trade

Marshall A. Wise, Haewon C. McJeon, Katherine V. Calvin, Leon E. Clarke, and Page Kyle

Year: 2014
Volume: Volume 35
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.35.SI1.9
View Abstract

Abstract:
Energy from biomass is potentially an important contributor to U.S. climate change mitigation efforts. However, large-scale implementation of bioenergy competes with other uses of land, including agriculture and forest production and terrestrial carbon storage in non-commercial lands. And with trade, bioenergy could mean greater reliance on imported energy. Based on EMF-24 policy specifications, this paper explores these dimensions of bioenergy's role in U.S. climate policy and the relationship to alternative measures for ameliorating the trade and land use consequences. It shows how widespread use of biomass in the U.S. could lead to imports; and it highlights that the relative stringency of domestic and international carbon mitigation policy will heavily influence the amount of imports. It demonstrates that limiting biomass imports could alter the balance of trade in other agricultural products. Finally, it shows that increasing efforts to protect both U.S. and international forests could also affect the balance of trade in other agricultural products. Keywords: Biomass, Bioenergy, Land use, Climate mitigation, Agricultural trade



Co-firing Coal with Biomass under Mandatory Obligation for Renewable Electricity: Implication for the Electricity Mix

Vincent Bertrand

Year: 2019
Volume: Volume 40
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.40.4.vber
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper analyses the effect of recognizing co-firing coal with biomass as renewable electricity. We provide simulations for the French and German electricity mix. Results indicate that, if co-firing is recognized as a renewable, coal may crowd-out traditional renewables with increased generation and additional investments. Regarding CO2 emissions, we find surges when co-firing is recognized as a renewable. The rise is more significant in Germany due to greater coal capacity. In France, the magnitude depends on the share of nuclear with a lower increase when old nuclear plants are prolonged. Finally, we find that recognizing co-firing as a renewable reduces the overall costs for electricity. We balance the cost saving with the increased social cost from higher CO2 emissions. Results show that the cost saving is lower than the increased carbon cost for society with carbon valuation around 100 Euros/tCO2, except in France when old nuclear plants are not decommissioned.





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