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The Economics of Gas Utilizationin a Gas-Rich, Oil-Poor Country: The Case of Bangladesh

Gulder Schramm

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No1-3
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Abstract:
It has become an article of faith that clean-burning, low-polluting natural gas is a premium fuel and that on a net heat basis it is inherently more valuable than its closest competitor, fuel oil. This conclusion has been drawn by comparing pollution characteristics of both fuels. While the conclusion is correct, it is correct only in regions that have free access to both natural gas and oil delivered to the user's premises at similar costs per Btu.



The Economics of Natural Gas Utilization in Developing Countries: Methodology

Y. Hossein Farzin

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-7
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Abstract:
The sharp oil price increases of the 1970s, and the consequent balance-of-payments difficulties, encouraged many oil-importing developing countries to develop and exploit their indigenous energy resources. Today, several developing countries with commercially attractive reserves of natural gas (for example, Bangladesh, Egypt, Pakistan, and Thailand) have seriously begun to use their gas resources for internal domestic and industrial purposes as well as for exports. They now confront the basic economic question of how to value gas resources and how to allocate them.



The Welfare Impacts of Rural Electrification in Bangladesh

Shahidur R. Khandker, Douglas F. Barnes, and Hussain A. Samad

Year: 2012
Volume: Volume 33
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol33-No1-7
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Abstract:
Lack of access to electricity has been considered a major impediment to the growth and development of rural economies. Thus, the provision of electricity and other forms of modern energy has been a priority for many development organizations, including the World Bank. However, few impact studies of electrification have taken the endogeneity of the grid connection into account. Using a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2005 of 20,900 rural households in Bangladesh, this paper examines the welfare impacts of household access to grid electricity after controlling for endogeneity bias. The econometric analysis shows that grid electrification has significant positive impacts on household income, expenditure, and education. The household gain in total income due to electrification is as high as 21 percent, with a 1.5 percentage point reduction in poverty per year. The results also suggest that the income and expenditure effects of electricity connection are higher for better-off households. Keywords: Rural electrification, Electrification impacts, Distributional impacts, Bangladesh





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