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The Effects of Energy Prices Upon Appliance Efficiencies and Building Insulation

Michael A. Einhorn

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No3-9
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Abstract:
Energy economists have long recognized the fact that changes in energy prices can affect the demand for energy in several ways (e.g., see Fisher and Kaysen, 1962; Taylor, 1975). In the short run, energy users can change their utilization of a fixed appliance stock or a fixed set of capital equipment. In the long run, a user may change the makeup of his appliance stock by purchasing appliances he has never owned in the past, allowing certain appliances to retire unreplaced, and replacing worn-out devices with new ones of different operating efficiencies or of different fuel-using types. Recent works by economists have focused upon these various aspects of energy usage. (Prominent studies of short-run effects include Lawrence, 1982; George, 1982; Parti and Parti, 1980; and McFadden, Puig, and Kirshner, 1977.



Appliance Depreciation and the Demand for Energy

Michael A. Einhorn

Year: 1987
Volume: Volume 8
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol8-No1-10
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Abstract:
Economists have long recognized that the cost of using an appliance or machine should incorporate both the associated energy cost and a user cost for the depreciation of capital that results. One must be careful in measuring the latter. Depending on whether the appliance or machine depreciates with time or usage, quite different measures of user cost can be valid. I attempt here to identify the differences and to suggest some possible tests for determining how consumers might incorporate appliance depreciation in their decision making.



The Effect of Load Management upon Transmission and Distribution Costs: A Case Study

Michael A. Einhorn

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-No1-6
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Abstract:
A new era may be emerging for the strategists and decision makers who are responsible for reliably and economically supplying electricity to America's homes and businesses. In the last decade, fuel shortages, price hikes, record-high interest rates, and a new environmentalist awareness have led the nation's utility planners to use conservation and load management strategies in order to curtail their customers' demands for energy and plant capacity. Undertaken primarily to reduce requirements for future generation capacity, load management strategies generally succeeded in reducing system peak load. However, utility planners often implemented these strategies with little regard to the effects upon their company's transmission and distribution (T&D) capacity requirements.





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