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Emissions of SO2, NOx and CO2 in Transition Economies: Emission Inventories and Divisia Index Analysis

Laurent Viguier

Year: 1999
Volume: Volume20
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol20-No2-3
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Abstract:
This paper analyses SO2, NOx, and CO2 emissions in three Eastern countries (Hungary, Poland and Russia) and in three OECD countries (France, the United Kingdom and the United States) for 1971-1994. The energy balances method is used to evaluate the emissions from major economic sectors. The emphasis is on explaining high levels of per capita emissions in transition economies. The analysis of the environment-economic growth relationship shows high emission intensities compared to OECD countries. A Divisia index approach is used to decompose the change in emission intensities into the effects of four components: emission factors, fuel mix, economic structure, and energy intensity. The main contribution to high emission intensities in transition economies is from the persistence of high energy intensities.



Is International Emissions Trading Always Beneficial?

Mustafa Babiker, John Reilly and Laurent Viguier

Year: 2004
Volume: Volume 25
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol25-No2-2
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Abstract:
Economic efficiency is a major argument for international emissions trading under the Kyoto Protocol. We show that permit trading can be welfare decreasing for countries, even though private trading parties benefit. The result is a case of "immiserizing" growth in the sense of Bhagwati where the negative terms of trade and tax interaction effects wipe out the gains from trading. Simulation and welfare decomposition results based on a CGE model of the global economy show that under EU-wide trading countries that are net permit sellers generally lose, due primarily to the existence of distortionary energy taxes.



Burden Sharing Within a Multi-Gas Strategy

Alain Bernard, Marc Vielle and Laurent Viguier

Year: 2006
Volume: Multi-Greenhouse Gas Mitigation and Climate Policy
Number: Special Issue #3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-VolSI2006-NoSI3-14
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Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to assess and compare regional welfare costs associated with alternative multi-gas strategies for a stabilization of global greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions in the long run. Mitigation costs of non-CO2 greenhouse gases are integrated into a multi-region multi-country CGE model of the world economy. Calibrations are based on GHG emissions projections from, and marginal abatement cost curves provided by, the EMF21 working group for the six greenhouse gases. We find that the introduction of non-CO2 GHGs in the mitigation strategy reduces significantly the welfare cost of a long term emissions stabilization policy but that benefits vary across regions. We also find that the various possible rules of emission quotas allocation may have large effects on the burden sharing among regions.





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