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Book Review - Electric Power: Deregulation and the Public Interest

William F. Thompson

Year: 1987
Volume: Volume 8
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol8-No3-12
No Abstract





Book Review - The Transportation of Soviet Energy Resources

Rod B. McNaughton

Year: 1987
Volume: Volume 8
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol8-No3-14
No Abstract





Incentives for Energy Conservation in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors

Kenneth E. Train

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-No3-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
The commercial and industrial sectors consume over half of the United States' electricity. Several studies have indicated that this consumption can be reduced by as much as 40 to 50 percent through cost-effective energy conservation (e.g., Dubin, 1977; Taussig, 1978). Examples of conservation actions include installation of low voltage lamps, more effective placement of lights, electronic controls for air conditioners and lights, evaporative precoolers on air conditioners and refrigerators, heat recovery systems, and so on. These actions have been found to offer, on average, exceptionally good rates of return, both to the firms that take the actions and from a social perspective (Train and Ignelzi, 1987).



Pareto Dominance Through Self-Selecting Tariffs: The Case of TOU Electricity Rates for Agricultural Customers

Kenneth E. Train and Nate Toyama

Year: 1989
Volume: Volume 10
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol10-No1-8
View Abstract

Abstract:
We estimate the impact of a voluntary time-of-use (TOU) rate option for electricity used in agricultural pumping. We find that offering the TOU tariff in addition to standard, non-TOU rates increases the profits of the electric utility and Pareto dominates the offering of standard rates alone. The analysis provides an example of the fact that Pareto improvements can be obtained by judiciously expanding the set of self-selecting tariffs offered by a public utility.



Rebates, Loans, and Customers' Choice of Appliance Efficiency Level: Combining Stated- and Revealed-Preference Data

Kenneth E. Train and Terry Atherton

Year: 1995
Volume: Volume16
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol16-No1-4
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Abstract:
Residential customers' choice of efficiency level for appliances, and their participation in demand-side management (DSM) programs, are examined using data on customers' stated preferences in hypothetical (i.e., conjoint-type) situations and their revealed preferences in real-world choices. The analysis provides information on customers' willingness to pay for energy savings, the importance of rebates in customers' decisions, and customers' response to DSM programs that offer loans for purchases of high-efficiency appliances. An estimated model is used to forecast the decisions of customers under: higher rebates, replacement of rebates with finance programs, offering of loans and rebates as alternative options for customers, and the elimination of DSM programs. We find that attractive loans (e.g., low interest rates, long repayment periods) are necessary to have the same effect as rebates. Programs that offer customers the option of loans or rebates are found to be far more effective than programs that offer only loans or only rebates.



Customers' Choice Among Retail Energy Suppliers: The Willingness-to-Pay for Service Attributes

Andrew A. Goett, Kathleen Hudson and Kenneth E. Train

Year: 2000
Volume: Volume21
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol21-No4-1
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Abstract:
We examine small/medium commercial and industrial customers' choices among energy suppliers in conjoint-type experiments. The distribution of customers' willingness to pay is estimated for more than 40 attributes of suppliers, including sign-up bonuses, amount and type of renewables, billing options, bundling with other services, reductions in voltage fluctuations, and charitable contributions. These estimates provide guidance for suppliers in designing service options and to economists in anticipating the services that will be offered in competitive retail energy markets.





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