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(Showing results 1 to 6 of 6)



Global Energy and CO2 to the Year 2050

Joe Edmonds and John Reilly

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No3-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
One of the important by-products of the combustion of fossil fuelsis carbon dioxide (C02), a nontoxic, colorless gas with a faintly pungent odor and acid taste. Carbon dioxide is not commonly thought of as apollutant. Rather, COs plays an important role in the determination of the global climate. The presence of C02 in the atmosphere produces a "greenhouse effect," allowing incoming sunlight to penetrate but trapping heatradiated back from earth. Man's ability to significantly affect COs levels through use of fossil fuel gives rise to the possibility of climate change atunprecedented rates.



Changing Climate and Energy Modeling: A Review

John Reilly and Jae Edmonds

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-13
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



The Cost of Capital: Estimating the Rate of Return for Public Utilities

Donna Smith

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-14
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



The Regulation of Public Utilities: Theory and Practice

Richard L. Gordon

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-15
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



Coal's Contribution to U.K. Self-Sufficiency

Richard L. Gordon

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-16
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



Electricity's Contribution to U.K. Self-Sufficiency

Richard L. Gordon

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-17
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



Oil's Contribution to U.K. Self-Sufficiency

Richard L. Gordon

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-18
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



America's Electric Utilities: Past, Present, and Future

Harry M. Trebing

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-19
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



The Politics of Middle Eastern Oil

Dankwart A. Rustow

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-21
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



Reforming the Regulation of Electric Utilities

Lester P. Taylor

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-22
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



Markets for Power: An Analysis for Electric Utility Deregulation

Milton Z. Kafoglis

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-20
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



Energy Today and Tomorrow

William A. Vogely

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-23
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years, the greenhouse problem has aroused widespread public concern. Changing Climate, a report by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (1983), represents a useful and timely synthesis of current scientific investigations of the impact of greenhouse gases on climate and society. The report is notable both for the research it documents and its influence on the public awareness of the issue.



Is International Emissions Trading Always Beneficial?

Mustafa Babiker, John Reilly and Laurent Viguier

Year: 2004
Volume: Volume 25
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol25-No2-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
Economic efficiency is a major argument for international emissions trading under the Kyoto Protocol. We show that permit trading can be welfare decreasing for countries, even though private trading parties benefit. The result is a case of "immiserizing" growth in the sense of Bhagwati where the negative terms of trade and tax interaction effects wipe out the gains from trading. Simulation and welfare decomposition results based on a CGE model of the global economy show that under EU-wide trading countries that are net permit sellers generally lose, due primarily to the existence of distortionary energy taxes.



The Role of Non-CO2 GHGs in Climate Policy: Analysis Using the MIT IGSM

John Reilly, Marcus Sarofim, Sergey Paltsev and Ronald Prinn

Year: 2006
Volume: Multi-Greenhouse Gas Mitigation and Climate Policy
Number: Special Issue #3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-VolSI2006-NoSI3-26
View Abstract

Abstract:
First steps toward a broad climate agreement, such as the Kyoto Protocol, have focused on less than global geographic coverage. We consider instead a policy that is less comprehensive in term of greenhouse gases (GHGs), including only the non-CO2 GHGs, but is geographically comprehensive. Abating non-CO2 GHGs may be seen as less of a threat to economic development and therefore it may be possible to involve developing countries in such a policy even though they have resisted limits on CO2 emissions. The policy we consider involves a GHG price of about $15 per ton carbon-equivalent (tce) levied only on the non-CO2 GHGs and held at that level through the century. We estimate that such a policy would reduce the global mean surface temperature in 2100 by about 0.55° C; if only methane is covered that alone would achieve a reduction of 0.3° to 0.4° C. We estimate the Kyoto Protocol in its current form would achieve a 0.25° C reduction in 2100 if Parties to it maintained it as is through the century. Furthermore, we estimate the costs of the non-CO2 policies to be a small fraction of the Kyoto policy. Whether as a next step to expand the Kyoto Protocol, or as a separate initiative running parallel to it, the world could well make substantial progress on limiting climate change by pursuing an agreement to abate the low cost non-CO2 GHGs. The results suggest that it would be useful to proceed on global abatement of non-CO2 GHGs so that lack of progress on negotiations to limit CO2 does not allow these abatement opportunities to slip away.



The CO2 Content of Consumption Across U.S. Regions: A Multi-Regional Input-Output (MRIO) Approach

Justin Caron, Gilbert E. Metcalf, and John Reilly

Year: 2017
Volume: Volume 38
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.38.1.jcar
View Abstract

Abstract:
Using a multi-regional input-output (MRIO) framework, we estimate the direct and indirect carbon dioxide (CO2) content of consumption across regions of the United States. We improve on existing estimates by accounting for emissions attributable to domestically and internationally imported goods using data describing bilateral trade between U.S. states and with international countries and regions. This paper presents two major findings. First, attributing emissions to states on a consumption basis leads to very different state-level emissions responsibilities than when attributed on a production basis; for example, California's emissions are over 25 percent higher. Second, heterogeneity of emissions across trading partners significantly affects the indirect emissions intensity of consumption (kg of carbon per $ of consumption), so regional differences in intensity across the U.S. go well beyond direct energy consumption. These findings have implications for evaluating the distributional impacts of national climate policies and for understanding differing incentives to implement state-level policies.



Hedging Strategies: Electricity Investment Decisions under Policy Uncertainty

Jennifer Morris, Vivek Srikrishnan, Mort Webster, and John Reilly

Year: 2018
Volume: Volume 39
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.39.1.jmor
View Abstract

Abstract:
Given uncertainty in long-term carbon reduction goals, how much non-carbon generation should be developed in the near-term? This research investigates the optimal balance between the risk of overinvesting in non-carbon sources that are ultimately not needed and the risk of underinvesting in non-carbon sources and subsequently needing to reduce carbon emissions dramatically. We employ a novel framework that incorporates a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model of the U.S. into a two-stage stochastic approximate dynamic program (ADP) focused on decisions in the electric power sector. We solve the model using an ADP algorithm that is computationally tractable while exploring the decisions and sampling the uncertain carbon limits from continuous distributions. The results of the model demonstrate that an optimal hedge is in the direction of more non-carbon investment in the near-term, in the range of 20-30% of new generation. We also demonstrate that the optimal share of non-carbon generation is increasing in the variance of the uncertainty about the long-term carbon targets, and that with greater uncertainty in the future policy regime, a balanced portfolio of non-carbon, natural gas, and coal generation is desirable.





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