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Modeling Energy Conservation Programs: An Application to Natural Gas Utilities

Adam Rose

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No4-7
View Abstract

Abstract:
In recent years conservation received a great deal of attention from energy managers at all levels. Some conservation measures were undertaken voluntarily because they were profitable. Others were adopted to comply with regulations, many of which were intended to reduce social costs of energy production and delivery. The 1970s have been characterized as the era of natural gas shortages, and conservation represented one of many reasonable alternatives for utilities confronted by potential and actual excess demand.



A Structural Decomposition Analysis of Changes in Energy Demand in Taiwan: 1971-1984

Chia-Yon Chen and Adam Rose

Year: 1990
Volume: Volume 11
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol11-No1-11
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Abstract:
Taiwan represents an interesting case study of a nation that has been able to adapt to the energy crisis remarkably well, registering sustained economic growth despite increased oil import expenditures. Certain characteristics of Taiwan's economy set it apart from a number of other developing countries. First, Taiwan's economy is very closely inter-linked with international markets. It is a major exporter of goods, and it has had to rely heavily on imports of energy since its indigenous energy resources are so meager. Second, the nation has had an unusually high rate of growth over the past 30 years. For example, Taiwan's GNP grew at an average rate of 9.1 percent per year during the period 1952-1980, as opposed to growth rates of generally below 5 percent experienced by many other LDCs during that period.



Book Review - Energy Analysis and Policy: Selected Works

Andre Plourde

Year: 1990
Volume: Volume 11
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol11-No4-7
No Abstract





Book Review - Energy Price Shocks and Macroeconomic Performance

Richard L. Gordon

Year: 1990
Volume: Volume 11
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol11-No4-9
No Abstract





Book Review - Energy Aftermath

Adam Rose

Year: 1990
Volume: Volume 11
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol11-No4-11
No Abstract



Regrets or No Regrets -- That is the Question: Is Conservation an Costless CO2 Mitigation Strategy?

Adam Rose and Shih-Mo Lin

Year: 1995
Volume: Volume16
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol16-No3-3
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Abstract:
Based on sectoral, or partial equilibrium, analyses, energy conservation has been offered as a "no regrets" CO2 mitigation strategy. Ours is the first study to isolate key features of conservation strategies in a general equilibrium context. The results indicate that conservation would have slightly negative! effects on the U.S. economy overall, in addition to sizable negative effects on most energy industries. Thus, while conservation may be a worthy CO2 mitigation strategy, it should not be oversold as costless.



Greenhouse Gas Reduction Policy in the United States: Identifying Winners and Losers in an Expanded Permit Trading System

Adam Rose and Gbadebo Oladosu

Year: 2002
Volume: Volume23
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol23-No1-1
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Abstract:
We present an analysis of the economic impacts of marketable permits for greenhouse gas reduction across industries and income groups in the United States. A computable general equilibrium model is used to simulate permit markets under various assumptions about permit allocations, industry coverage, revenue recycling, sequestration, and the inclusion of multiple greenhouse gases. Our results indicate that a permit price of as much as $128 per ton carbon would be needed to comply with the full U.S. Kyoto commitment, and that this would lead to a slightly more than I percent reduction in GDP in the year 2010. Expansion of trading to include carbon sequestration and methane mitigation can significantly lower these impacts. However, all policy alternatives simulated are somewhat regressive in terms of income distribution, though to significantly different degrees depending on the policy design.



Interregional Sharing of Energy Conservation Targets in China: Efficiency and Equity

Dan Wei and Adam Rose

Year: 2009
Volume: Volume 30
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol30-No4-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
Energy conservation is a long-term strategic policy in China to support its economic and social development. This strategy is important for saving resources, protecting the environment, and ensuring a secure supply of energy. However, energy conservation often involves large amounts of investment and may also have dampening impacts on some local and regional economies. Moreover, energy conservation has many features of a public good. Therefore, government policy will have to play a strong role to foster local efforts and interregional cooperation on this issue. This paper analyzes a promising policy instrument � an interregional energy conservation-quota trading system. An operational model is developed to simulate the workings of this policy instrument for a variety of quota allocations among regions. The results indicate that a tradable quota system can help China achieve its conservation target in a cost-effective way and in accordance with its regional development strategy.



A Meta-Analysis of the Economic Impacts of Climate Change Policy in the United States

Adam Rose and Noah Dormady

Year: 2011
Volume: Volume 32
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol32-No2-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper provides a meta-analysis of a broad set of recent studies of the economic impacts of climate change mitigation policies. It evaluates the influences of the impacts of causal factors, key economic assumptions and macroeconomic linkages on the outcome of these studies. A quantile regression analysis is also performed on the meta sample, to evaluate the robustness of those key factors throughout the full range of macro findings. Results of these analyses suggest that study results are strongly driven by data inputs, economic assumptions and modeling approaches. However, they are sometimes affected in counterintuitive ways.





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