Facebook LinkedIn Instagram Twitter
Shop
Search
Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

Search Results for All:
(Showing results 1 to 10 of 13)

Next 10 >>


The Potential Role of Natural Gas in a Major Oil Crisis

Benjamin Schlesinger, Nelson E. Hay, and Jacquelyn S. Mitchell

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No2-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
Most energy experts in the federal government involved with contingency planning concern themselves with what to do when or if "the balloon goes up"; i.e., after the nation's 6-million-barrel-per-day oil supply is substantially cut off.



Oil Supply Disruptions and the Role of the International Energy Agency

Douglas R. Bohi and Michael A. Toman

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No2-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper examines key crisis management provisions of the IEA Agreement in relation to the interests of member countries in energy security cooperation' and considers ways these interests might be further served by altering the agreement. Two observations underlie both the motivation and thrust of this investigation. The first is that the potential benefits to members of energy security cooperation are likely to be substantial.' Thus, it may be assumed that TEA members have an incentive to find methods inside or outside the agreement for reaping at least part of these gains. Given these incentives, it is important to consider how potential gains from cooperation can be achieved in practice.



An Integrated Analysis of U.S. Oil Security Policies

Frederic H. Murphy, Michael A. Toman, and Howard J. Weiss

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No3-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
Despite waning governmental interest, the current world oil market provides a valuable opportunity for reflecting on how U.S. policies can be structured to best guard against future disruptions in oil supplies. A vast literature on this subject has developed over the past few years. Yet, important points of disagreement remain.



Spinning Wheels: A Review Article

T. Randall Curlee and Arthur W. Wright

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-No2-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
In March 1987, the U.S. Department of Energy published a report entitled Energy Security. This was a comprehensive presentation of the American government's view of both the world energy situation and the policies it advocates. Because of the importance of this report, The Energy Journal commissioned a series of studies to critically analyze key aspects of the report and extend the discussion. In this issue, we offer the first set of these studies. Our July issue will present three papers on the value of an oil import fee (or tariff). Notes, comments, and letters to the editor on this topic are strongly encouraged.Special FeatureSpinning Wheels: A Review ArticleT. Randall Curlee and Arthur W. WrightEnergy Security Revisited: A Report to the President of the United States (U.S. Department of Energy, March 1987) is a hefty book-240 pages of text, five appendices (several based on macroeconometric simulations), and fourteen pages of references (but no index). Parts of the book are quite good and constitute a major improvement over what passed for studies of energy security in the 1960s and 1970s. Unfortunately, most of the book's heft is wheel spinning: a lot of energy is expended, but we do not get very far. Greater understanding of energy security could have been accomplished in far fewer pages.



A Critical Analysis of the DOE Report

S. Fred Singer

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-No2-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
The DOE Report, Energy Security, responds to White House con-cern about the decline of domestic oil production and the rise of oil imports. The Report (1987) has three purposes: to present data; to make projections; and to analyze policy alternatives. It is intended to provide a basis for making rational policy choices, but it does not make specific recommendations.My analysis here is intended as a critique of the report so that policy decision making can be improved. My analysis deals mainly with the oil sector; the report itself is more comprehensive. I provide specific recommendations relating mainly to producer and consumer tax policy, import fees, and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) although the report covers a wider range of topics, including federal leasing policy.



Energy Policy in the European Community: Conflicts Between the Objectives of the Unified Single Market, Supply Security and a

John Surrey

Year: 1992
Volume: Volume 13
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol13-No3-11
View Abstract

Abstract:
Policies for energy and the environment in Europe were previously the preserve of national governments, but the Commission of the European Community has gained a role in both policy areas in the past few years. This was due to the 1987 Single European Act which, in effect, extends the writ of competition law throughout the energy and other previously "excluded" sectors, the desire to reduce acid rain and greenhouse gas emissions, and reaffirms Europe's renewed concern for long-term oil and gas supply security after the Gulf War and the disintegration of the USSR. The Commission's proposals for the unified internal energy market were driven by concern for competition and free market forces, and seemed to exclude any scope for long-term policy considerations. This paper argues that the implementation of those proposals will be uneven and protracted, and that the Commission's more recent proposals for reducing CO2 emissions and the European Energy Charter appear to mark positive steps towards a long-term strategy for a clean environment, energy efficiency, and oil and gas supply security.



Oil Imports and National Security: Is There Still a Connection?

John H. Lichtblau

Year: 1994
Volume: Volume 15
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol15-NoSI-18
View Abstract

Abstract:
This article examines the impact of oil imports on U.S. national security. It reviews oil's links with national security, and questions the arguments for curbing imports. Debated since the 1950s, the links are based on oil's unique role in fueling the economy, its role for the sparring superpowers during the Cold War, and the political instability of the Middle East. The article challenges the "military externality' argument that U. S. imports require military protection. It compares U.S. import dependency with the much higher import dependency of most other industrial countries, none of which have expressed a national security concern similar to that of the U.S. It also points out that the source of imports is irrelevant, as the petroleum market functions globally with respect to volume and price: a shortage anywhere is a shortage everywhere. Finally, the article discusses the oft-used balance of payments argument for reducing coil imports, questioning the calculations on which it is based. It concludes that any argument for reducing oil imports for balance of payments reasons applies equally to other imported commodities.



On the Renewal of Concern for the Security of Oil Supply

Chantale LaCasse and Andre Plourde

Year: 1995
Volume: Volume16
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol16-No2-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
It seems curious that the security of oil supply would again emerge as a source of concern precisely when oil market conditions seem to be most favourable to oil-importing nations. We trace this development to the increased import volumes that have followed the 1986 collapse in the world oil price, and argue that concerns over the source of oil are of primary importance only in situations where physical availability is likely problematic. As the conception of security of supply is broadened, a distinction between random and strategic shocks is useful. Supply-side considerations, such as stockpiles, seem apt only to address the consequences of random shocks. As time horizons lengthen, supply-side measures lose their effectiveness, and demand-side considerations emerge as possible means of dampening the macroeconomic effects of future strategic shocks. Implementation remains an unresolved issue: the expected costs and benefits of specific interventions must still be compared.



Global Demand Growth of Power Generation, Input Choices and Supply Security

Kenichi Matsui

Year: 1998
Volume: Volume19
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol19-No2-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
The anticipated global demand growth for energy, and electricity in particular, is mapped for the coming 20 years. Five critical issues implied by this forecast are then spelled out: uncertainty, security of energy supply, energy financing, and the role of nuclear and renewable energy. Finally, based on a review of the energy revolutions which the human race has experienced during history, the paper sketches a long term energy future. It suggests the possibility of a new energy era in the 21st century with electricity and hydrogen as the main final energy and nuclear and renewables as the main primary energy, providing, coincidentally, a solution to the CO2 issues that loom so importantly at the end of the 20th century.



Economic Development and End-Use Energy Demand

Kenneth B. Medlock III, and Ronald Soligo

Year: 2001
Volume: Volume22
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol22-No2-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
We examine the relationship between economic development and energy demand. The paper identifies the development patterns that characterize particular economic sectors, and analyzes the effect of sector-specific energy demand growth rates on the composition of final energy demand. We also examine some of the associated policy implications. Industrial energy demand increases most rapidly at the initial stages of development, but growth slows steadily throughout the industrialization process. Energy demand for transportation rises steadily, and takes the majority share of total energy use at the latter stages of development. Energy demand originating from the residential and commercial sector also increases to surpass industrial demand, but long term growth is not as pronounced as it is in the transport sector. These results have implications for the primary energy demand of an economy as it develops, and thus, for domestic energy security and global geopolitical relationships.




Next 10 >>

Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

 





function toggleAbstract(id) { alert(id); }