Facebook LinkedIn Instagram Twitter
Shop
Search
Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

Search Results for All:
(Showing results 1 to 7 of 7)





Effects of Taxes and Price Regulation on Offshore Gas

Henry D. Jacoby and James L. Smith

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-NoSI-21
No Abstract



Toward an Optimal Oil and Gas Leasing System

Walter J. Mead

Year: 1994
Volume: Volume15
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol15-No4-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
The four principal leasing systems-work program, royalty, profit share (including rent resource tax), and bonus bidding are reviewed relative to their efficiency in maximizing and collecting the present value of economic rents. Empirical research is shown to support theoretical conclusions that the most efficient system appears to be bonus bidding, without a fixed royalty, with leases issued in perpetuity, with environmental and other regulations required to pass a benefit/cost test, and with elimination of any nationalistic or other barriers to entry.



Effects of an Increasing Role for Independents on Petroleum Resource Development in the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region

Omowumi O. Iledare, Allan G. Pulsipher and Robert H. Baumann

Year: 1995
Volume: Volume16
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol16-No2-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
Major oil and gas companies are shifting their exploration and production (E&P) investment from the United States to foreign countries. As they do so, smaller companies, "independents," are expected to play a more prominent role in domestic E&P. Within both industry and government circles the apprehension is widespread that such a shift from the majors to the independents will cause domestic oil and gas resources to be developed less aggressively and less efficiently. This paper attempts to discern and quantify differences infirm behavior and success among firms of different sizes (majors, large and small independents) operating on the Gulf of Mexico OCS region. Contrary to conventional thinking, descriptive analysis of data on drilling effort and outcomes on the Gulf of Mexico indicates independents have been both more aggressive and successful than the majors in exploration while the majors have been only moderately more successful than independents in development drilling.



Oil Spills, Workplace Safety and Firm Size: Evidence from the U.S. Gulf of Mexico OCS

Omowumi O. Iledare, Allan G. Pulsipher, David E. Dismukes, and Dmitry Mesyanzhinov

Year: 1997
Volume: Volume18
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol18-No4-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
Accidents on offshore oil and gas platforms have declined dramatically during the past decade, yet concern about safety and environmental damages from offshore operations seems to have intensified. In the U.S. Gulf of Mexico, some of this concern is premised on an offshore restructuring caused by major oil and gas companies investing more heavily in exploration and production (E&P) in foreign countries, leaving more domestic E&P to smaller 'independents' assumed to be less careful and capable than majors. Both industry, and regulatory specialists believe this trend will increase the risk of accidents and oil spills. However, our analysis found no evidence that more independents would threaten workers' safety or the marine environment. In fact, on average independents had a slightly better record than the majors. We also found that the, Minerals Management Service's platform inspection program had a beneficial and statistically significant effect, decreasing both offshore accidents and oil' spills.



The Impact of Changes in Crude Oil Prices and Offshore Oil Production on the Economic Performance of U.S. Coastal Gulf States

Omowumi Iledare and Williams O. Olatubi

Year: 2004
Volume: Volume 25
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol25-No2-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper investigates the effects of changes in crude oil prices and offshore oil and gas production on the economic performance of U.S. Coastal Gulf States Texas, Louisiana, Alabama and Mississippi. The empirical results do not provide statistical evidence to reject the hypothesis that positive shocks to oil and gas prices and production variation increase the economic performance of these coastal Gulf States. However, the magnitude of the response to changes in prices varies across the states. In addition, the empirical results show significant differences in the duration of the lingering economic effects of price shocks and changes in production among the states. The duration varies depending upon whether the state is a net petroleum exporter or net importer, and whether the state has a diversified economic base or structure.



Modelling the Growth in Gas Reseves From Known Fields

Kevin F. Forbes and Ernest M. Zampelli

Year: 2009
Volume: Volume 30
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol30-NoSI-13
View Abstract

Abstract:
The extent to which future United States demand for natural gas is satisfied by imports of LNG is contingent on the adequacy and cost competitiveness of North American supplies. One of the cheaper and more important sources of natural gas supply is accounted for by reserve appreciation, i.e., reserve growth, in known fields. Based on an extensively applied methodology developed by Arrington (1960), the increase in proved ultimate recovery is presumed to increase at a diminishing rate with the age of the field. In this paper, a single equation model of natural gas reserve growth in the Gulf of Mexico is developed and estimated. The results strongly suggest that the annual growth rate in the reserves of a field is significantly affected by initial discovery size, price, water depth, and unobserved field-specific effects. Hence, estimating oil and gas reserve growth using an Arrington based approach may underestimate the response of reserve growth to changes in economic fundamentals.





Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

 





function toggleAbstract(id) { alert(id); }