Search

Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

Search Results for All:
(Showing results 1 to 3 of 3)



Lessons Learned from Electricity Market Liberalization

Paul L. Joskow

Year: 2008
Volume: Volume 29
Number: Special Issue #2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol29-NoSI2-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
This paper discusses the lessons learned from electricity sector liberalization over the last 20 years. The attributes of reform models that have exhibited good performance attributes are identified, drawing on empirical analysis of market structure, behavior and performance in many countries. Wholesale and retail market competition and network regulation performance evidence are discussed. Technical, economic, and political challenges to improving the efficiency of what continue to be partial liberalization programs in many countries are considered.



Markets vs. Regulation: A Role for Indicative Energy Planning

Ignacio J. Perez-Arriaga and Pedro Linares

Year: 2008
Volume: Volume 29
Number: Special Issue #2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol29-NoSI2-8
View Abstract

Abstract:
The energy sector worldwide is facing the enormous challenge of finding a path of economic, environmental, and social sustainability. This paper argues that, although markets are adequate instruments to achieve an efficient allocation of resources and to promote private initiative, the resolution of the sustainability challenge cannot be left only to market forces, but requires other complementary instruments, among which we highlight indicative energy planning. We discuss the role of indicative energy planning in the future of liberalized energy markets, and propose a general methodology for its implementation, as well as the identification of the major issues to be addressed.



Avoiding Pitfalls in China’s Electricity Sector Reforms

Michael R. Davidson and Ignacio Pérez-Arriaga

Year: 2020
Volume: Volume 41
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/01956574.41.3.mdav
View Abstract

Abstract:
China has recently reinvigorated reforms to its electricity sector, focusing on increasing the role of markets and improving regulation. While restructuring an electricity sector is difficult and can require years of detailed planning, China's approach relies upon broad central guidelines with many details and initiatives left to provincial governments. We assess the current state of reform efforts through the lens of five "pitfalls" based on well-established regulatory economics literature and international lessons, focusing on contract structure, system operation, and regulation. We find that while market efforts are likely to achieve efficiency gains with respect to the planned system, they may fall short of crucial functions of a market, such as incentivizing flexibility given increasing renewable energy penetrations. Making markets work will likely require a stronger centralization of market design and regulatory oversight authorities.





Begin New Search
Proceed to Checkout

 

© 2022 International Association for Energy Economics | Privacy Policy | Return Policy