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Change and Continuity

P. H. Frankel

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No4-1
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Abstract:
This award, which elevates me to the ranks of its previous distin-guished recipients, gives me great pleasure, especially since I am the first non-American to receive it. This in itself is an indication of the ever-widening scope of the Association. It comes to me at the end of a long life devoted to our industry. It is almost sixty years since I entered it as a junior business executive ... It is now forty years since I wrote my first book, appropriately titled Essentials of Petroleum, and almost thirty years since I left business to make my hobby my job when I formed Petroleum Economics Ltd., an international consulting firm.



Energy and Economy: Global Interdependences

William W. Hogan

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No4-2
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Abstract:
This meeting, the Seventh International Conference of the International Association of Energy Economists (IAEE), finds us again in the midst of transitions in energy markets. Continued adjustments in oil demand, natural gas bubbles in Europe and North America, closures of refineries, and concerns about acid rain are just a few of the issues that reflect the turbulence and continued change in energy concerns and policy. This list of challenges suggests opportunities for energy economists to contribute their special perspectives to the clarification of issues and options. At an international conference, we can reinforce communications across national boundaries as we consider our related problems.



The Residential Adoption of Electricity in Early Twentieth-Century America

Arthur G. Woolf

Year: 1987
Volume: Volume 8
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol8-No2-2
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Abstract:
The commercial development of electricity in the late nineteenth century brought about a technological revolution comparable to, if not exceeding, the development of the steam engine more than a century earlier. While the steam engine laid the groundwork for the Industrial Revolution and altered the social, economic, and political framework of eighteenth and nineteenth-century Western Europe, the development of electricity had an equally significant impact in a later era.



Seven Centuries of Energy Services: The Price and Use of Light in the United Kingdom (1300-2000)

Roger Fouquet and Peter J.G. Pearson

Year: 2006
Volume: Volume 27
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol27-No1-8
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Abstract:
Before the mid-eighteenth century, most people lived in near-complete darkness except in the presence of sunlight and moonlight. Since then, the provision of artificial light has been revolutionised by a series of innovations in appliances, fuels, infrastructures and institutions that have enabled the growing demands of economic development for artificial light to be met at dramatically lower costs: by the year 2000, while United Kingdom GDP per capita was 15 times its 1800 value, lighting services cost less than one three thousandth of their 1800 value, per capita use was 6,500 times greater and total lighting consumption was 25,000 times higher than in 1800. The economic history of light shows how focussing on developments in energy service provision rather than simply on energy use and prices can reveal the �true� declines in costs, enhanced levels of consumption and welfare gains that have been achieved. While emphasising the value of past experience, the paper also warns against the dangers of over-reliance on past trends for the long-run forecasting of energy consumption given the potential for the introduction of new technologies and fuels, and for rebound and saturation effects.



International Economic Interdependency and U.S. National Energy Policy

Arnold B. Baker

Year: 2010
Volume: Volume 31
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol31-No4-3
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Abstract:
This paper briefly reviews some key aspects of U.S. energy policy history and policy-making complexity, considers the issues and pressures that growing international economic interdependency may bring, and suggests some ap�proaches and tools for improvement.





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