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The Economics of Gas Utilizationin a Gas-Rich, Oil-Poor Country: The Case of Bangladesh

Gulder Schramm

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No1-3
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Abstract:
It has become an article of faith that clean-burning, low-polluting natural gas is a premium fuel and that on a net heat basis it is inherently more valuable than its closest competitor, fuel oil. This conclusion has been drawn by comparing pollution characteristics of both fuels. While the conclusion is correct, it is correct only in regions that have free access to both natural gas and oil delivered to the user's premises at similar costs per Btu.



The Relationship Between Refined Product Imports and Refined Product Prices in the United States

John J Gonzales

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-5
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Abstract:
Since the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) emerged in the early 1970s as a dominating force in the world petroleum market, much effort has been devoted to investigating the relationship between U.S. demand for crude oil imports, the world price of crude oil, and the domestic price of crude oil.' Little attention has been paid, however, to the role of refined product imports in the U.S. market. My purpose is to fill this gap through an empirical investigation of the "competitiveness" of refined product imports in the domestic market. The focus will be on the motor gasoline, residual fuel oil, middle distillates, and jet fuel markets, as these four products account for most domestic product consumption.



The Impact of Natural Gas Imports on Air Pollutant Emissions in Mexico

Alberto Bustani and Elisa Cobas

Year: 1993
Volume: Volume14
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol14-No3-1
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Abstract:
This paper analyzes the impact that natural gas imports could have on fuel emissions in northern Mexico. We discuss the problem created in the 1980s when a shift from natural gas to residual oil in industrial processes increased emissions of air pollutants significantly. The benefits of substituting leaded for unleaded gasoline in the 1990s are discussed also.In July 1992 the Mexican government announced for the first time since oil nationalization that private companies in Mexico are allowed to directly import natural gas. The transportation of natural gas, however, remains reserved only for Pemex, the national oil company. This opens the possibility of reducing the burning of high-sulphur residual oil in both the industrial and the energy production sectors in Mexico, particularly in the northern region where only 6.7% of the of the country's natural gas is produced. Natural gas imports have also opened the possibility of using compressed natural gas (CNG) in vehicles in northern Mexico.



What Drives Natural Gas Prices?

Stephen P. A. Brown and Mine K. Yucel

Year: 2008
Volume: Volume 29
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol29-No2-3
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Abstract:
For many years, fuel switching between natural gas and residual fuel oil kept natural gas prices closely aligned with those for crude oil. More recently, however, the number of U.S. facilities able to switch between natural gas and residual fuel oil has declined, and over the past seven years, U.S. natural gas prices have been on an upward trend with crude oil prices but with considerable independent movement. Natural gas market analysts generally emphasize weather and inventories as drivers of natural gas prices. Using an error-correction model, we show that when these and other additional factors are taken into account, movements in crude oil prices have a prominent role in shaping natural gas prices. Our findings imply a continuum of prices at which natural gas and petroleum products are substitutes.





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