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Balancing Energy Supply and Demand: A Fifty-Year Global Perspective

Paul S. Basile

Year: 1981
Volume: Volume 2
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol2-No3-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
Over the next five decades, even with vigorous conservation measures in industrialized regions, increasing needs for liquid fuels throughout the world may exceed the capabilities of global energy supply systems. The "energy problem," viewed in a sufficiently long-term and global perspective, is not an energy problem, strictly speaking, but an oil problem, or more precisely, a liquid fuels problem.



Comment on "Balancing Energy Supply and Demand"

John Foster

Year: 1981
Volume: Volume 2
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol2-No3-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
While a number of energy studies assume a national or regional perspective, just a few attempt a global approach, and these are typically concerned with the implications for industrialized nations. More-over, very few published studies look at the long-term global scene as far ahead as even the year 2000 (e.g., WAES and Exxon's World Energy Outlook), and only one to my knowledge extends its perspective to 2020 (Conservation Commission of the World Energy Conferences, 1977). So the long-awaited IIASA report, (as summarized here by Paul Basile), represents a landmark.



Will President Reagan's Energy Policy Lead Households to Conserve?

Eric S. Brown

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No1-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
When energy was cheap and easily available, consumers' paid little attention to their energy use and bills, so after the supply disruptions of the1970s, they were poorly equipped to deal with the changes they faced in energy prices and availability. During the 1970s, the federal government undertook various programs of education and assistance, including dissemination of printed information, establishment of energy standards for federally financed homes, and tax credits for use of alternative energy sources.









Notes - Risk Analysis of Alternative Energy Sources

Daniel R. Kazmer

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No1-11
No Abstract



Reply to "Risk Analysis of Alternative Energy Sources"

Miller B. Spangler

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No1-12
No Abstract



Wood Energy Bibliography

n/a

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No1-13
No Abstract





Notes - Comment on "Economic Implications of Mandated Efficiency..."

Stanley M. Besen and Leland L. Johnson

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No1-9
No Abstract



Whatever Happened to the Energy Crisis?

Hendrik S. Houthakkee

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No2-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
The term energy crisis was apparently first used in the later 1960s, by whom I am not sure. Presumably it means a situation where the available energy supplies are so low as to prevent or even reverse economic growth. The underlying idea is that energy is mostly derived from fossil fuels which will be exhausted within relatively few years. Although since the 1960s there have been one or two episodes that are occasionally interpreted as energy crises, it is by now clear that whatever it is that ails the world economy, it is not a shortage of fossil fuels. In fact, popular discussions have recently turned from the oil "shortage" to the oil "glut."In retrospect, it appears that predictions of an energy crisis were just another example of a resource scare, of which there have been many in the past. As long ago as 1865, the great English economist William Stanley Jevons worried about the consequences of Britain running out of coal. As it happens, Britain is still producing large amounts of coal and has also gone into oil and gas in a big way.



Nigeria's Internal Petroleum Problems: Perspectives and Choices

Akin Iwayemi

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No4-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
As a major oil producer and member of OPEC, Nigeria benefited greatly from the sharp increases in world oil prices during the 1970s. It was especially hard hit by the weakening of oil markets during the past four years, when its oil production had to be cut back sharply and its prices reduced. The impact of these developments, including the replacement of the civilian government by a military regime in December 1983, has been discussed elsewhere. I Less well known abroad is the fact that during this entire period, Nigeria suffered sporadic but severe internal energy supply problems, including shortages of petroleum products and irregular availability of electricity. If past policies are continued, Nigeria's energy problems are likely to become severe enough to jeopardize its position as an oil exporter.



A Decision Analysis Approach to Energy System Expansion Planning

James P. Peerenboom and Wesley K. Foell

Year: 1985
Volume: Volume 6
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol6-No3-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
Capacity expansion decisions are critically important to both public and private-sector energy suppliers as well as regional and national energy planning agencies. Simplistically stated, planning for the expansion of an energy supply system involves determining when and where new energy production facilities of various types and sizes should be deployed to meet projected demands. As with most energy-related decision problems, several factors complicate capacity expansion planning. These factors include the involvement of multiple decisionmakers and interest groups, uncertainties about technology costs and demand projections, varying degrees of risk associated with alternative energy technologies, the need to consider costs and effects over long time horizons, and the difficulty of quantifying key impacts and concerns.



Optimal Structure of the Nigerian Energy Supply Mix

Anthony O. Adegbulugbe, Felix Davo, Thomas Gurtler

Year: 1989
Volume: Volume 10
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol10-No2-11
View Abstract

Abstract:
Nigeria, a member of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), is blessed with relatively abundant energy resources like petroleum, gas, coal, solar, hydropower, etc. With an estimated population of 80 million, the country also has abundant human resources. In spite of her varied human and energy resources, the performance of the Nigerian economy has been closely linked with one resource, petroleum, a situation characteristic of most OPEC member countries.



Energy Supply in the 1990s and Beyond

Subroto

Year: 1990
Volume: Volume 11
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol11-No1-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
I am both honored and pleased to be invited to address this, the 11th Annual Conference of the International Association for Energy Economics. Honored, because your Association is a body whose gatherings are always marked by the distinction of the participants, drawn from the ranks of the oil industry, other energy sectors, the academic world, international institutions and government departments. Accordingly, the presentations of the speakers have an impact which extends far beyond the bounds of your membership.



Multiple Energy Supply Risks, Optimal Reserves, and Optimal Domestic Production Capacities

Peter Zweifel and Matteo Ferrari

Year: 1992
Volume: Volume 13
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol13-No4-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
This study starts from the observation that today's Western trading nations are exposed to multiple risks of energy supplies, e.g. simultaneous shortage of oil and electricity supplies. To cope with these risks, oil can be stockpiled as well as domestic capacity for power production built up. Adopting the viewpoint of a policy maker who aims at minimizing the expected cost of security of supply, optimal simultaneous adjustments of oil stocks and electric production capacities to exogenous changes such as economic growth are derived. Against this benchmark, one dimensional rules such as "oil reserves for 90 days" turn out to be not only suboptimal but also to foster adjustments that exacerbate suboptimality.



Energy Economics: A Place for Energy Poverty in the Agenda?

Fatih Birol

Year: 2007
Volume: Volume 28
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol28-No3-1
View Abstract

Abstract:
The global energy system faces three major strategic challenges in the coming decades: the growing risk of disruptions to energy supply; the threat of environmental damage caused by energy production and use; and persistent energy poverty. The first two challenges have attracted a lot of attention from the energy-economics community, much less so the need to address the problem of energy under-development. On current trends, the number of people in poor countries relying primarily on traditional biomass for their energy needs will continue to rise, while the number lacking access to electricity will barely fall. To change this course, decisive policy action is needed urgently as part of the broader process of human development. Meeting basic human needs, such as food and shelter, must be at the heart of any strategy to alleviate poverty. Modern energy services help enable those needs to be met. In practice, concrete improvements in human welfare can be realised quickly at modest short-term cost. Strong political will and commitment on the part of the governments of the world's poorest countries will be crucial. Rich industrialised countries have an important role to play in this process too. In addition to moral issues involved, we have obvious long-term economic, political and energy-security interests in helping developing countries along the path to energy development. The cost of providing assistance to poor countries may turn out to be far less than that of dealing with the instability and insecurity that poverty creates.




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