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Household Welfare Loss Due to Electricity Supply Disruptions

Arun P. Sanghvi

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-NoSI-3
No Abstract



The Demand for Electricity Services and the Quality of Supply

Romesh Dias-Bandaranaike and Mohan Munasinghe

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No2-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
The spiraling costs of energy within the last decade have stimulated renewed interest in the increased efficiency of energy production and consumption.' Electricity is a relatively mature sector where considerable theoretical work on the economic aspects has been carried out since the 1950s.2 While the microeconomic principles underlying optimal investment planning and pricing policy have received much attention in the recent literature, less effort has been devoted to the effects of quality of supplyand output reliability.



A Note on Optimal System Planning

Ferdinand E. Banks

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No4-8
View Abstract

Abstract:
There are two relatively harmless slips in the interesting and important paper on optimal system planning by Michael Einhorn (1983). Both are associated with the intermediate plant.



Book Review - Oil Economists' Handbook 1984

Jack D. Kirwan

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No4-9
View Abstract

Abstract:
There are two relatively harmless slips in the interesting and important paper on optimal system planning by Michael Einhorn (1983). Both are associated with the intermediate plant.



Letters to the Editor

n/a

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No4-10
View Abstract

Abstract:
There are two relatively harmless slips in the interesting and important paper on optimal system planning by Michael Einhorn (1983). Both are associated with the intermediate plant.



Acknowledgements

n/a

Year: 1984
Volume: Volume 5
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol5-No4-11
View Abstract

Abstract:
There are two relatively harmless slips in the interesting and important paper on optimal system planning by Michael Einhorn (1983). Both are associated with the intermediate plant.



Long-Term Versus Short-Term Costs of Electricity Supply Interruptions: A Cautionary Note

Peter Lewin and Steve G. Parsons

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No2-13
View Abstract

Abstract:
Increasing attention has been given in recent years to the valuation of reliability in the supply of electricity. It is peculiar in the use of the terms that the value of reliability is equivalent to the cost of unreliability. In attempting to identify and measure this cost, researchers have drawn a distinction between different types of cost, particularly short- and long-term costs. In this paper, we examine this distinction to clarify what may be a source of confusion.



Long-run Adjustment to Alternative Levels of Reliability in Electricity Supply

Robert W. Gilmer and Richard S. Mack

Year: 1986
Volume: Volume 7
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol7-No4-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
Most studies of reliable electricity supplies have been artful efforts to quantify the benefits of additional electric generating capacity (Webb; Andersson and Taylor). Outages are treated as the result of insufficient capacity, and outage costs are weighed against whatever outlays are necessary to bring new generation into the electrical system. Given the emphasis on long-run supply in the ultimate usefulness of these studies, research has focused to a remarkable degree on the cost of individual outage events (Sanghvi, 1982). The customer's long-run response to a change in reliability levels has rarely received much attention, and when it has been considered it has been treated as an analytically difficult or intractable problem. Our purpose is to show that the economics of long-run adjustments to a different level of reliability are in fact quite simple and easily incorporated into standard cost/benefit studies.



Reliability of Electricity Supply, Outage Costs and Value of Service: An Overview

M. Munasinghe and A. Sanghvi

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Special Issue 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-NoSI2-1
No Abstract



Risk and Cost of Failure in the French Electricity System

Lucien Gouni and Phillippe Torrion

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Special Issue 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-NoSI2-3
No Abstract



Regulatory View of Capacity Valuation in California

Eric Woychik

Year: 1988
Volume: Volume 9
Number: Special Issue 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol9-NoSI2-4
No Abstract





Low-Cost Strategies for Coping with CO2 Emission Limits (A Critique of "CO2 Emission Limits: an Economic Cost Analysis for the USA" by Alan Manne and Richard Richels)

Robert H. Williams

Year: 1990
Volume: Volume 11
Number: Number 4
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol11-No4-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
Manne and Richels (Mann and Richels, 1990) have developed a useful modelling framework for evaluating the potential economic impacts of alternative strategies for coping with greenhouse warming. Their estimate is that the discounted present value of economic consumption losses arising from a 20% reduction in CO2 emissions through the next century is in the range of $0.8 to $3.6 trillion. This critique shows that the options for reducing CO2 emissions through energy demand reduction and energy supply shifts are much broader than those considered by Manne and Richels in the initial run of their model. The possibilities are so diverse with both present and future technologies, that the minimum CO2 emissions constraint penalty estimated by Mann and Richels may well prove to be too high - and the possibility of a negative penalty cannot be ruled out. Marine and Richels are correct in arguing that a vigorous R&D program is needed to keep economic consumption losses associated with constraints on CO2 emissions at low levels, and that waiting for clarification of the scientific issues relating to the greenhouse warning before launching such R&D efforts would be unwise, but the priorities for R&D implicit in the initial nun of their model are much too narrowly focused. As this analysis indicates, a much more broadly based energy R&D program is called for.




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