Facebook LinkedIn Twitter

IAEE Members and subscribers to The Energy Journal: Please log in to access the full text article or receive discounted pricing for this article.

Energy Realities for the Third Millennium

Complexity, controversy, and timidity continue to rule considerations of energy policy for the United States. This combination of impediments has guaranteed the continuing absence of a rational and comprehensive policy reconciling energy, environmental, economic, and security issues.A pragmatic set of energy milestones for America to achieve by the end of the first quarter of the next century can be easily defined:� The last coal-fired power plant and the first environmentally benignfusion power plant would have been built.� The first commercial assembly plant for hydrogen-fueled automobileswould have reached full production along with the creation of thenecessary hydrogen fuel infrastructure throughout the country.� Clean, safe, and efficient transportation systems would have fullyreplaced the automobile in the core areas of the ten largest cities.� The first total conversion of a southwestern suburb to solar heating andcooling, solar electric house power, and solar electric cars would havebeen completed.

Purchase ( $25 )

Energy Specializations: Energy and the Economy – Energy as a Productive Input; Energy and the Economy –Economic Growth and Energy Demand; Energy and the Economy – Resource Endowments and Economic Performance; Energy and the Economy – Energy Shocks and Business Cycles

JEL Codes:
O13 - Economic Development: Agriculture; Natural Resources; Energy; Environment; Other Primary Products
Q34 - Natural Resources and Domestic and International Conflicts
F44 - International Business Cycles

Keywords: Energy policy, Third millennium

DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol10-No4-1

Published in Volume 10, Number 4 of The Quarterly Journal of the IAEE's Energy Economics Education Foundation.