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Residential Electricity Revisited

Hendrik S. Houthakker

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No1-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
The following is a report on various attempts to update and improve an earlier analysis of residential electricity demand (Houthakker, Verleger, and Sheehan, 1974-hereafter referred to as HVS). To understand what is new the reader should first know what has been maintained, namely:1. the logarithmic flow-adjustment model which estimates this year's consumption from last year's consumption, this year's price and income, and possibly (though not in HVS) from other variables,2. the pooling of annual time series for 48 states using the error component approach of Balestra & Nerlove, 3. the use of a "marginal price" for electricity.The present paper may be regarded as a verification of the first of these hypotheses, and to some extent of the other two.



Residential Substitution of Off-peak for Peak Electricity Usage under Time-of-Use Pricing

Douglas W. Caves and Laurits R. Christensen

Year: 1980
Volume: Volume 1
Number: Number 2
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol1-No2-4
View Abstract

Abstract:
This article reports on the methodology, procedures, and conclusions from the first phase of our econometric analysis of the Wisconsin Time-of-Use (TOU) Electricity Pricing Experiment.' Dur-ing Phase I, which took place during the summers of 1976 and 1977, we confined our attention to assessing consumer ability and/or willingness to shift electricity usage from peak to off-peak (P/OP)



An Analysis of Department of Energy Residential Appliance Efficiency Standards

Raymond S. Hartman & MIT Energy Laboratory

Year: 1981
Volume: Volume 2
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol2-No3-5
View Abstract

Abstract:
Over the past several years, the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies have initiated an array of policies aimed at limiting domestic consumption of fossil fuels. Several policy initiatives, aimed at residential fossil-based energy conservation, have included residential appliance efficiency standards, the commercialization of residential applications of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations and solar thermal appliances, and the implementation of energy performance standards for buildings. Each of these programs alone will reduce residential fossil fuel consumption. However, it remains unclear how they interact. In this article I examine how two programs may interact. In particular, I assess how well appliance efficiency standards will reduce fuel consumption and whether a standards program will conflict with or complement the DOE's PV commercialization efforts.



The Short-Run Residential Demand for Natural Gas

Roberta Barnes, Robert Gillingham, Robert Hagemann

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No1-3
View Abstract

Abstract:
Effective and efficient energy conservation policy requires accurate and comprehensive estimates of residential energy demand pa-rameters. These parameter estimates are among the most important inputs into informed policy decisions. In turn, accurate estimation of energy demand parameters requires realistic modeling of the consumer's demand behavior, detailed information on energy consumption, and careful treatment of any econometric problems created by the model and data base.



Costs and Benefits of Residential Time-of-Use Metering

David Huettner, Jack Kasulis, and Neil Dikeman

Year: 1982
Volume: Volume 3
Number: Number 3
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol3-No3-6
View Abstract

Abstract:
During the past few years interest in time-of-day (TOD) pricing has grown in the electric utility industry. Federal regulations, par-ticularly the Public Utility Regulatory Policy Act (PURPA), plant licensing problems, and the extremely high cost of new utility plants along with regulatory commission unwillingness to pass on higher costs to consumers have all played a part in this process. As the results of various TOD experiments have become available, interest has naturally turned to assessing costs and benefits.



The Cost Of Residential Electric Power Outages

Robert W. Gilmer and Richard S. Mack

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-NoSI-4
No Abstract



Distributed Lags and the Demand for Electricity

Ronald J. Sutherland

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-NoSI-9
No Abstract



Asymmetry in the Residential Demand for Electricity

Trevor Young, Thomas H. Stevens, and Cleve Willis

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Special Issue
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-NoSI-10
No Abstract



Natural Gas Availability and the Residential Demand for Energy

Gail R. Blattenberger, Lester D. Taylor, and Robert K.Rennhack

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No1-2
View Abstract

Abstract:
Not all households have access to pipeline-delivered natural gas.This fact affects not only the demand for natural gas but the demand for electricity and fuel oil as well. Since electricity and natural gas are substitutes in cooking, space heating, water heating, and (to a much lesser extent) cooling, the price elasticity of demand for electricity will be larger when gas is available than when it is not. Fuel oil and natural gas are substitutes in cooking, space heating, and water heating, so that oneshould also expect larger price elasticities for fuel oil when gas is available.





Notes - Costs and Benefits of Residential Time-of-Use Metering: Reply

David A. Huettner, Jack Kasulis, and Neil Dikeman

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No1-11
No Abstract



Letters to the Editor

n/a

Year: 1983
Volume: Volume 4
Number: Number 1
DOI: 10.5547/ISSN0195-6574-EJ-Vol4-No1-12
No Abstract




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